What’s new and news

Speaker at Business Conference and Presentation.First: What is new with Ebola since the last post? Another nurse from Texas and a doctor in New York are infected. The Centers for Disease Control has held two teleconferences with nurses across the country and issued revised infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of Ebola to health care workers. Also last week the American Jail Association disseminated guidelines developed by two jails in and around Dallas where the first case in the United States originated. I hope you have reviewed and perhaps revised your communicable disease screening and identification procedures as well as the availability and use of personal protective equipment consistent with these new recommendations.

NCCHC Fall Conference: Celebrity Chef Jeff Henderson was the key note speaker at the fall conference took place in Las Vegas last week. Henderson got his GED and learned culinary skills while serving a nine year sentence in Federal prison for drug dealing. Once released he continued to develop his culinary skills, eventually becoming Executive Chef at Café Bellagio and Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas and writing four self-help books including his autobiography, ‘Cooked’. Now he works with young people to provide alternatives to getting involved in the illegal drug trade and is a motivational speaker. He has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Good Morning America, The Montel Williams Show, CNBC, NPR’s All Things Considered, People and USA Today.

My favorite of all the stories he told was about buying all the top ramen noodles he could afford from the prison commissary. He wasn’t interested in the noodles which he passed out to everyone on the cell block who wanted some. Instead he wanted the seasoning mix that was included with the noodles. As head chef, he used these to spice up the cheese wiz to make his nachos, now famous in prison lore. Jeff Henderson was a young man in prison when he read his first book, was called “son” for the first time, and had someone acknowledge something that he did well in school. He has a great message about self-help and a convincing perspective for all of us involved in the criminal justice system.

Here is a recipe from Cooked (pages 163-164). When Jeff makes fried chicken he still uses this recipe from Friendly Womack, who was the chief inmate cook at the federal prison outside Las Vegas when Jeff was serving time there.

Friendly’s Famous Buttermilk Fried Chicken

2 tablespoons cayenne pepper                                 2 teaspoons onion powder

3 tablespoons black pepper                                        4 tablespoons kosher salt

2 cups all-purpose flour                                                 1 quart buttermilk

1 chicken cut into eight pieces

  1.  Mix all of the spices together in a bowl. Put half the seasoning mix in another bowl. Add the flour to one bowl, mix well and set aside.
  2. Rub the chicken with the reserved spice mix. Poke all the pieces with a fork a few times and set aside. (Friendly taught me to pierce the chicken pieces with a fork so the buttermilk seeps down into the bird.)
  3. Pour the buttermilk into a stainless steel bowl. Add the remaining spices and the chicken pieces. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for an hour.
  4. Dip the chicken pieces into the seasoned flour, pat the pieces together and make sure they are heavily coated.
  5. Drop them into a deep fryer or in a deep pan with enough vegetable oil to cover the chicken. Turn the chicken as it browns and remove once done.

News about the doings of contributing authors: Authors who contributed to Essentials of Correctional Nursing were also prominent during the NCCHC Conference. Margaret Collatt and Sue Smith gave a presentation about a project to develop guidelines for correctional nurses in chronic care management. In addition to Margaret and Sue, the group working on this project includes:

Sue Lane, RN, ASN CCHP                              Susan Laffan, RN CCHP-A CCHP-RN

Pat Voermans, MS, RN, ANP, CCHP-RN Patricia Blair, PhD, LLM, JD, MSN, CCHP

Lorry Schoenly, PhD, RN, CCHP-RN          Sabrina McCain, RN, ASN CCHP

Lori Roscoe, PhD, ANP-C, CCHP-RN          Debbie Franzoso, LPN, CCHP

They have two guidelines in development right now. One is on management of hypertension and the other concerns seizure disorders. The presenters encouraged nurses to participate in this process by commenting on the format for the guidelines and the topics that are important to correctional nurses. Watch for more news about this important project.

Mary Muse gave two presentations that serve to inspire the practice of correctional nurses. One was from the ANA Nursing Scope and Standards of Professional Practice on two steps in nursing process: Implementation and Evaluation. She used two case examples which always help to make standards real in their application to our daily practice. She also presented a session on the Transformation of Nursing Leadership reminding us of the challenges and expectations for nurses with the change resulting from the Affordable Care Act and the report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on the Future of Nursing.

Margaret and Susan Laffan teamed up to give four presentations throughout the conference. These included sessions on the cardiovascular examination, understanding lab values and critical thinking as part of nursing process. As usual with these two presenters, the sessions were full of practical information, fun and door prizes as well.

Margaret and Susan joined with Sue Medley-Lane for a session on Rejuvenation of Nursing Spirit. For Susan Laffan, rejuvenation comes when she dons her pink fuzzy slippers which you will sometimes see her smoozing around the conference in. These presenters discussed the demands of life that can contribute to a loss of spirit and ways to mitigate the cumulative effect of these experiences. They asked correctional nurses to tell the stories and describe the experiences that have inspired their commitment to the field and will collect these and send the collection back out to participants. If you have a story or experience that has been your inspiration for correctional nursing send it to njjailnurse@aol.com by November 30, 2014. The story must include your name, your state and your email address. It should be no more than 300 words long and the names of any patients in the story should be changed.

If you have some ideas about what you think the guidelines for nursing management of chronic care should include or subjects that should be covered please respond in the comments section of this post. If you have an inspirational story about correctional nursing that you would like to share please send it to Susan Laffan at njjailnurse@aol.com by November 30, 2014.

For more on correctional nursing read our book, the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order your copy directly from the publisher. Use promotional code AF1209 for $15 off and free shipping.

Ebola: Another Look at Infection Control

EbolaA colleague of mine from Dallas, Texas mentioned on a phone call last week how busy things were in the health care industry with the death of Mr. Duncan from Ebola. Now that Nina Pham, a nurse who cared for him has Ebola, I imagine things have heated up even more. Another nurse in Spain has been infected as well after caring for a patient with Ebola. I’ve also seen one report of a jail in Wisconsin that has a detainee under medical surveillance for Ebola symptoms because she recently arrived from West Africa.

People worry about infectious diseases especially when it is a new and threatening disease, even when the risk of infection seems remote. Nurses are a trusted resource and often the first person staff and inmates seek information from about an infectious disease and what can be done to protect themselves. The next several months will be an opportunity for correctional nurses to shine in providing accurate information and advice about Ebola and infection control more generally.

Health teaching and promotion is one of the American Nurses Association (ANA) practice standards for correctional nurses (2013). The competencies for health teaching and promotion include:

  • Addressing a variety of topics that reduce risk and promote health.
  • Using teaching methods appropriate to the situation and the audience.
  • Seeking feedback and evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching strategies used.
  • Using information technologies to communicate information.

Here are five tips to use in providing health information about Ebola for staff and inmates at your correctional facility.

  1. Give credible information. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is going to be your best resource. Here is the link to the CDC web page which includes the latest news and advice for hospitals as well as community settings. Another resource is the local health department for your area. It is not uncommon for people to bring forward concerns or information that is contrary to your information or advice. The best approach here is just to cite your sources and ask that those with opposing information cite theirs so that individuals can make up their own minds after considering the information they have received.
  2. Give concrete suggestions about what to do. People often feel helpless and vulnerable in the face of a disease that they know little about. Suggesting concrete steps that can be taken goes a long way toward reducing the fear and anxiety associated with an unknown risk. You might suggest, for example, looking up one of your references or giving people a resource site to go to. Another suggestion might be for someone to assess their knowledge and skill in hand hygiene or use of personal protective equipment.
  3. Reinforce the information already known about infection control. Ebola is spread by direct contact with infected body fluids. We know that prevention measures are to use standard, contact and droplet precautions when caring for someone with an infectious disease transmitted by direct contact. Emphasize the measures that are already in place at your facility to protect staff and other inmates from transmission by direct contact.
  4. Link new information to past efforts and successes. The concern and anxiety about a new infectious disease can be reduced if staff and inmates can see a link to other successes with infection control practices in everyday life.
  5. Look for allies to help spread the word. If you can demystify the disease, people will feel less victimized by the unknown and uncontrollable and ready to take the steps they need to in protecting themselves. When non-medical personnel at a correctional facility embrace the facts about Ebola and the steps to prevent transmission you have mastered control of the infection. Often getting an organization to this place is jump started when a member of the custody staff becomes a spokesperson about the disease. Invest time in sharing information with interested custody staff and they will help carry the message. The same is true for inmates; often peer educators are more effective than professionals in getting important health information across to others.

Two more thoughts about how as correctional nurses we can prepare for the Ebola virus:

  • Even if the possibility of the disease presenting at your facility may seem remote ask what can be learned from it about the infection control practices you have in place. For example, the nurse in Dallas is hypothesized by CDC to have become infected as a result of a breach in infection control practices. We all know how routine infection control practices are part of the daily routine so ask yourself if there are breakdowns you may not be aware of? It is a good time to audit infection control procedures to ensure that identification and prevention measures are up to date and intact.
  • Keep up with information about the disease and what is recommended in relation to infection control. Our hearts go out to the nurse, Nina Pham; and we want to learn everything we can from her experience so we can protect ourselves. The CDC is investigating the infection control practices she used and it will be important for every nurse to incorporate what we learn into our own practice.

The CDC is sponsoring a teleconference for health care professionals on preparing for Ebola October 14 and the ANA has a resource page about Ebola for nurses. What advice do you have for correctional nurses about how to respond to questions about Ebola virus? Please share your advice by responding in the comments section of this post.

For more on standard, contact and droplet precautions see Chapter 10 Infectious Diseases written by Sue Smith in the Essentials for Correctional Nursing. She also discusses the role of correctional nurses in providing information and education about infectious disease. Order your copy directly from the publisher. Use promotional code AF1209 for $15 off and free shipping.

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Dealing with the Difficult Patient

Stressed manLast week I attended the fall meeting of the Oregon Chapter of the American Correctional Health Services Association. I have belonged to this organization for 30 years and have received a lot of professional support over the years, especially continuing education. These are my notes from an interesting presentation by Daryl Ruthven, M.D., CCHP, Director of Psychiatry for the Oregon Department of Corrections.

Demanding, non-compliant, whining, threatening, somatizing, malingering, drug-seeking, mentally ill, frequent flyer are some of the ways difficult patients are described. Their behavior can be so obstructive that it’s possible to miss important information or data about them and compromise our clinical work. Certain personality types are more likely to take up more time when seen at sick call or in clinic. These include people with antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, histrionic, dependent or organic personality types. The first thing to remember is that the patient’s behavior is consistent with their personality type and not likely to change just because they are seeking health care. Reduce the likelihood of missing important clinical information by remaining non-judgmental about their behavior and objective during assessment and evaluation of their condition.

The Angry Patient: Unless the patient is brain damaged or intoxicated, anger is a response to fear or threat. The patient is afraid of something that either is or is not going to happen as a result of the encounter. Anger sometimes is used as a display to intimidate others. In this situation the patient may need to vent a bit first. Then try to figure out what the patient is scared or anxious about. They may not be aware that their anger is a response to threat and so it may take a bit of dialogue to identify the problem. A good question to ask is “What do you fear will happen?” or “What are you most concerned about?” The encounter should be terminated if the anger is escalating or becomes abusive rather than defusing.

The Demanding Patient: Uses confrontation as a means to force a desired result. Demands are usually accompanied by a direct or indirect threat. Demanding behavior may be a result of fear, sociopathy, or poor assertive skills training or advice. Most patients are as interested in relief of a problematic symptom as they are in a specific outcome. With this in mind, remind the patient of the responsibilities each party has in the patient/provider relationship. The patient’s responsibility is to provide information about the problem and to decide whether to follow the plan of care suggested by the provider. The provider’s responsibility is to listen to the patient, assess the problem and determine the treatment options that are most appropriate to address the problem.

The Splitting Patient: Pits staff against each other to create chaos and in the midst of the confusion achieves a goal. When a nurse (or other provider) feels confused or at odds with other health care providers about a patient’s plan of care it is a good sign that splitting is taking place. The most important action to take with a splitting patient is to bring the team together to agree on a consistent plan to manage the patient’s care. This should include developing a comprehensive treatment plan (including custody and mental health staff) and reviewing it together at regular intervals.

The Threatening Patient: The facility or health care program should have no tolerance for physical threats and train staff in how this kind of behavior is addressed. The specifics of threatening behavior should be documented thoroughly in a report of the incident. Threatening legal action is very common. Suggestions here are to know enough about the law to appreciate how poor health care must be before a finding of “deliberate indifference” and “cruel and unusual punishment” can be made. Staying up to date with the literature and competent clinically along with thorough documentation protects nurses from tort liability. Basically providing and documenting good nursing care provides sufficient protection from legal threats.

Conclusions: Finally, don’t respond unprofessionally to the difficult patient by yelling, use of sarcasm, counter threatening or reacting emotionally. These responses undermine the power of the provider in the relationship with the patient and can destroy the reputation and authority of the clinician.

Difficult patients do have health problems that need to be identified, assessed and treated. These patients also have something that they are scared of or bothering them. Asking “What are you most concerned about?” or “What do you fear will happen?” may help identify this underlying problem so it can be addressed. Set limits that are appropriate to the responsibilities of each in the provider/patient relationship. Discuss the patient’s options calmly and clearly. Seek help from others to manage difficult patients. Take care to prevent becoming jaded, desensitized or overwhelmed by difficult patients by taking regular time off and developing interests and relationships outside of work.

What tips do you have to manage an encounter with a “difficult patient”? Add to the advice given here by responding in the comments section of this post.

There is much more on this subject in the Essentials for Correctional Nursing. Lorry Schoenly discusses working with difficult patients in Chapter 4 Safety for the Nurse and the Patient. Also Roseanne Harmon describes care of patients who have personality disorders in Chapter 12 Mental Health. Order your copy directly from the publisher. Use promotional code AF1209 for $15 off and free shipping.

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Correctional Nursing Peer Review: Some Examples

cocheAlthough the concept of nursing peer review is over two decades old, it is just coming of age in the correctional nursing specialty as the newest version of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care Accreditation Standards has expanded the Clinical Performance Enhancement Program (Standard C-02) to include RNs and LPNs. This is the fourth in a 4-part series of posts on correctional nursing peer review. Find other posts on this topic here.

Recently I queried correctional nurse leaders around the country about what they were doing regarding nursing peer review. Many responded that they were researching the process and just getting started. Here are examples of what some systems have developed thus far. They may help you determine what would be best for your purposes.

The Washington state prison system is using a form to document peer review of these practice factors:

  • MAR Completion
  • Completion of Assessments
  • Nurse Care Plan & documented follow-up
  • Documentation
  • Seeks Consultation Appropriately
  • Appropriate Application of Guidelines
  • Clinical Knowledge Base
  • Interest in Improving Skills
  • Patient-oriented Care
  • Professionalism
  • Professional Ethics
  • Patient Education
  • Observed Clinical Skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Delegates tasks appropriately

Armor Correctional Health Services, Inc. is using a system that follows the nursing process, reviewing documentation for these practice factors:

  • Legibility of notes
  • Each entry includes date, time, signature and printed name
  • Sufficient information to understand the condition
  • Appropriate assessment includes objective information about the condition
  • Appropriate format and documentation (ie: soap v. incidental note, abbreviations)
  • Ordering of medication (from the right vendor, right medication, right dose)
  • Documentation on the medication administration record
  • Completion of referrals as appropriate

The Ohio state prison system has had a nursing peer review program in place since 2007. They review nursing documentation for each nurse every 2 years. Ten charts are selected – 5 by the reviewer and 5 by the nurse being reviewed. Their policy specifically states that results of the nursing peer review are never used as grounds for disciplinary or punitive action. Instead, a remediation plan may be initiated, if appropriate.

Are you developing a Nursing Peer Review program in your setting? Share your experiences in the comments section of this post.

To read more about professional practice issues see Chapter 19 in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. The text can be ordered directly from the publisher and if you use Promo Code AF1402 the price is discounted by $15 off and shipping is free.

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Correctional Nursing Peer Review: Making It Practical

Peer Review written in white chalkAlthough the concept of nursing peer review is over two decades old, it is just coming of age in the correctional nursing specialty as the newest version of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care Accreditation Standards has expanded the Clinical Performance Enhancement Program (Standard C-02) to include RNs and LPNs. This is the third in a 4-part series of posts on correctional nursing peer review. Find other posts on this topic here.

Building a nursing peer review program from the ground up can be a daunting task. Here are some practical ideas for how to have a successful nursing peer review process that is efficient and effective.

Create Links to Current Programs

Although nursing peer review is different from continuous quality improvement, nursing competency reviews, or performance evaluations, these programs can be linked to the nursing peer review process in several ways.

  • Trending in CQI studies can help in prioritizing which professional standards to review in any given time period. If studies are showing that withdrawal protocols are not being initiated as expected in a jail setting, assessment and decision-making on intake might be a priority professional standard for nursing peer review.
  • Likewise, if competency evaluation of new orientees shows deficits in differentiating dental urgencies and emergencies, this can become a peer review priority.
  • Because performance evaluations often involve compensation and employment behavior, it is best to have a clear separation between the performance evaluation and the nursing peer review process. However, if trends in clinical issues emerge during the performance evaluation process, these issues might help make determinations of which professional standards will be the focus of upcoming peer reviews.
  • Other clinical data can also inform a nursing peer review program. Information from risk management, medication errors, mortality reviews, and emergency room visit trending may indicate a particular focus for evaluating clinical performance.

Involve Everyone

Involving front-line nurses in the creation of the program and prioritization of the standards used for the review will encourage maximum participation. The challenge of peer review is maintaining a climate of professional development rather than one of evaluation and criticism. It may be tempting for a nurse manager to complete the nursing peer review on all nurse employees. A team effort, instead, can provide professional growth among the staff. Properly managed, nursing peer review can be a supportive and encouraging professional process. Poorly managed nursing peer review can seem punitive and discouraging.

Create Forms

Forms provide structure to any process, especially new ones. If a form is used for peer reviews there is more opportunity for consistency. In addition, a form can operate as a checklist to prompt a reviewer on  elements requiring attention. Staff are more likely to get involved if they have a written format to follow. NCCHC also recommends the use of a standard form in the discussion of the C-02 standard.

Spread Reviews Across the Calendar

Work out a program for peer review throughout the year rather than trying to do it all at once. Make it a monthly or quarterly activity; possibly attached to an existing quality improvement or meeting structure. The important point is to keep nursing peer review as an active and ongoing process rather than a periodic disconnected project.

Are you developing a Nursing Peer Review program in your setting? Share your experiences in the comments section of this post.

To read more about professional practice issues see Chapter 19 in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. The text can be ordered directly from the publisher and if you use Promo Code AF1402 the price is discounted by $15 off and shipping is free.

Photo Credit: © lculig – Fotolia.com

Correctional Nursing Peer Review: Determining Discipline-Specific and Community Standards

Peer review whiteboardAlthough the concept of nursing peer review is over two decades old, it is just coming of age in the correctional nursing specialty as the newest version of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care Accreditation Standards has expanded the Clinical Performance Enhancement Program (Standard C-02) to include RNs and LPNs. This is the second in a 4-part series of posts on correctional nursing peer review. Find other posts on this topic here.

There are four key components to the ANA definition of nursing peer review according to their published  Guidelines.

  • Practicing Registered Nurses
  • Assess, monitor, and make judgments about
  • Nursing care provided
  • Measured against professional standards of practice

Accepted professional standards of practice for correctional nurses, then, provide the basis for a nursing peer review program. The NCCHC standard C-02 focuses attention on the competence of the individual under review. The ANA places peer review centers on the complementary goals of quality and safety. Thus, a peer review process for correctional nurses that encompasses competent, quality, and safe care provision is recommended.  Three primary sources of community and discipline-specific standards for nursing peer review programs are outlined below.

ANA Correctional Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice

The American Nurses Association Correctional Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice (affiliate link) provide key professional nursing standards focused on the unique nature of the correctional nursing specialty. Therefore, they provide an excellent foundation for a nursing peer review program. The six Standards of Practice, in particular, provide competency statements appropriate for use in peer review. These standards follow the nursing process and include:

  • Assessment
  • Diagnosis
  • Outcomes Identification
  • Planning
  • Implementation: Coordination of care, health teaching and health promotion, consultation, prescriptive authority and treatment (Advanced Practice Nurses)
  • Evaluation

State Boards of Nursing – Nurse Practice Acts

Nursing practice is governed by state legislation. State boards of nursing then provide the guidance for the nursing profession through interpretation of the nurse practice act and by developing administrative rules or regulations that clarify practice act components. Although they vary among the states, nurse practice acts all contain the standards and scope of nursing practice under their jurisdiction. Here are some examples of practice standards common to most Nurse Practice Acts and follow the key elements of the nursing process

  • Nursing Assessment
  • Patient-centered Health Care Plans
  • Independent Nursing Judgments
  • Provision of Care (as ordered or prescribed by authorized health care providers)
  • Evaluation of Interventions
  • Patient Teaching
  • Delegation of Nursing Interventions
  • Patient Advocacy

Links to state nurse practice acts can be found on the National Council of State Boards of Nursing website along with a helpful article describing the standard factors of nurse practice acts.

Accreditation Standards that Address Nursing Clinical Practice

Many NCCHC accreditation standards address organizational structure and process but some address individual professional practice. Most come from Section E: Patient Care and Treatment. Those standards can be incorporated into a nursing peer review program. Here are a few examples of appropriate accreditation standards to consider:

  • Receiving Screening
  • Transfer Screening
  • Initial Health Assessment
  • Mental Health Screening and Evaluation
  • Nonemergency Health Care Requests and Services
  • Nursing Assessment Protocols
  • Discharge Planning
  • Infirmary Care
  • Intoxication and Withdrawal

Are you developing a Nursing Peer Review program in your setting? Share your experiences in the comments section of this post.

To read more about professional practice issues see Chapter 19 in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. The text can be ordered directly from the publisher and if you use Promo Code AF1402 the price is discounted by $15 off and shipping is free.

Photo Credit: © lculig – Fotolia.com

Correctional Nursing Peer Review: What It Is and What It Isn’t

Frau mit Lupe vor dem GesichtAlthough the concept of nursing peer review is over two decades old, it is just coming of age in the correctional nursing specialty as the newest version of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care Accreditation Standards has expanded the Clinical Performance Enhancement Program (Standard C-02) to include RNs and LPNs. This is the first in a 4-part series on correctional nursing peer review.

Peer review is a familiar program to providers (physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant) as a means of evaluating the quality of care provision by individual practitioners. Nurses, however, can have difficulty applying this concept to their own clinical practice. The American Nurses Association’s (ANA) Nursing Peer Review Guidelines provides a definition and set of principles for the nursing peer review process that are applicable in the correctional setting.

What It Is

The original ANA definition of nursing peer review stands today as an appropriate description of the process:

“Peer review in nursing is the process by which practicing registered nurses systematically access, monitor, and make judgments about the quality of nursing care provided by peers as measured against professional standards of practice”

Breaking down the components of this definition supplies key concepts for a nursing peer review program in corrections:

Practicing Registered Nurses

Peer review should be performed by nurses who are practicing in a similar context. Thus, it would not be appropriate to have critical care nurses evaluate the nursing care of correctional nurses or for emergency nurses to evaluate the care of neonatal nurses. Nurses practicing in a similar context understand the environment of care, the patient population, and the standard processes for accomplishing care that would not be familiar to a nurse from another context.

Assess, Monitor, Make Judgments

Peer review is an evaluative judgment about the actions of another staff member from the same profession. The primary objective is to determine the quality and safety of care provided by an individual staff member.

Nursing Care Provided

A major component of the definition of nursing peer review is that it is a judgment of actual care provided. This is often done as a chart review but could also be performed as direct observation. However, the evaluation is of actual nursing care provided rather than a nurse’s ability to provide care.

Measured against Professional Standards of Practice

Accepted professional standards of practice are used to determine the quality and safety of care in a peer review. These accepted standards should be known to all members of the peer review process. For correctional nurses, professional standards of practice can come from

  • ANA Correctional Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice
  • State Board of Nursing Practice Act
  • Accreditation Standards that Address Clinical Practice

What it Isn’t

There can be misconceptions about what constitutes nursing peer reviews. Based on the above defining qualities of a nursing peer review, these are not nursing peer review processes:

Annual Performance Evaluation

An annual performance evaluation is a judgment of an employee’s work as it relates to their hired status and job description. Although clinical practice is a part of a nurse’s job performance, it is often not the primary focus of the performance evaluation.

Nursing Competency Checklists

Competency checklists or skills reviews evaluate a nurse’s ability to perform various skills and functions. They do not evaluation actual nursing care provided.

Simulations Such as Man-Down or Disaster Drills

As with competency or skill evaluations, simulations such as man-down or disaster drills evaluate staff ability to perform in an emergency situation but do not evaluate actual nursing care in a real clinical situation.

Continuous Quality Improvement Projects

Continuous quality improvement projects look aggregately at clinical care provided while nursing peer review evaluates a specific clinician’s actual care provision.

Are you developing a Nursing Peer Review program in your setting? Share your experiences in the comments section of this post.

To read more about professional practice issues see Chapter 19 in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. The text can be ordered directly from the publisher and if you use Promo Code AF1402 the price is discounted by $15 off and shipping is free.

Photo Credit: © Bernd Leitner – Fotolia.com