What’s new and news

Speaker at Business Conference and Presentation.First: What is new with Ebola since the last post? Another nurse from Texas and a doctor in New York are infected. The Centers for Disease Control has held two teleconferences with nurses across the country and issued revised infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of Ebola to health care workers. Also last week the American Jail Association disseminated guidelines developed by two jails in and around Dallas where the first case in the United States originated. I hope you have reviewed and perhaps revised your communicable disease screening and identification procedures as well as the availability and use of personal protective equipment consistent with these new recommendations.

NCCHC Fall Conference: Celebrity Chef Jeff Henderson was the key note speaker at the fall conference took place in Las Vegas last week. Henderson got his GED and learned culinary skills while serving a nine year sentence in Federal prison for drug dealing. Once released he continued to develop his culinary skills, eventually becoming Executive Chef at Café Bellagio and Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas and writing four self-help books including his autobiography, ‘Cooked’. Now he works with young people to provide alternatives to getting involved in the illegal drug trade and is a motivational speaker. He has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Good Morning America, The Montel Williams Show, CNBC, NPR’s All Things Considered, People and USA Today.

My favorite of all the stories he told was about buying all the top ramen noodles he could afford from the prison commissary. He wasn’t interested in the noodles which he passed out to everyone on the cell block who wanted some. Instead he wanted the seasoning mix that was included with the noodles. As head chef, he used these to spice up the cheese wiz to make his nachos, now famous in prison lore. Jeff Henderson was a young man in prison when he read his first book, was called “son” for the first time, and had someone acknowledge something that he did well in school. He has a great message about self-help and a convincing perspective for all of us involved in the criminal justice system.

Here is a recipe from Cooked (pages 163-164). When Jeff makes fried chicken he still uses this recipe from Friendly Womack, who was the chief inmate cook at the federal prison outside Las Vegas when Jeff was serving time there.

Friendly’s Famous Buttermilk Fried Chicken

2 tablespoons cayenne pepper                                 2 teaspoons onion powder

3 tablespoons black pepper                                        4 tablespoons kosher salt

2 cups all-purpose flour                                                 1 quart buttermilk

1 chicken cut into eight pieces

  1.  Mix all of the spices together in a bowl. Put half the seasoning mix in another bowl. Add the flour to one bowl, mix well and set aside.
  2. Rub the chicken with the reserved spice mix. Poke all the pieces with a fork a few times and set aside. (Friendly taught me to pierce the chicken pieces with a fork so the buttermilk seeps down into the bird.)
  3. Pour the buttermilk into a stainless steel bowl. Add the remaining spices and the chicken pieces. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for an hour.
  4. Dip the chicken pieces into the seasoned flour, pat the pieces together and make sure they are heavily coated.
  5. Drop them into a deep fryer or in a deep pan with enough vegetable oil to cover the chicken. Turn the chicken as it browns and remove once done.

News about the doings of contributing authors: Authors who contributed to Essentials of Correctional Nursing were also prominent during the NCCHC Conference. Margaret Collatt and Sue Smith gave a presentation about a project to develop guidelines for correctional nurses in chronic care management. In addition to Margaret and Sue, the group working on this project includes:

Sue Lane, RN, ASN CCHP                              Susan Laffan, RN CCHP-A CCHP-RN

Pat Voermans, MS, RN, ANP, CCHP-RN Patricia Blair, PhD, LLM, JD, MSN, CCHP

Lorry Schoenly, PhD, RN, CCHP-RN          Sabrina McCain, RN, ASN CCHP

Lori Roscoe, PhD, ANP-C, CCHP-RN          Debbie Franzoso, LPN, CCHP

They have two guidelines in development right now. One is on management of hypertension and the other concerns seizure disorders. The presenters encouraged nurses to participate in this process by commenting on the format for the guidelines and the topics that are important to correctional nurses. Watch for more news about this important project.

Mary Muse gave two presentations that serve to inspire the practice of correctional nurses. One was from the ANA Nursing Scope and Standards of Professional Practice on two steps in nursing process: Implementation and Evaluation. She used two case examples which always help to make standards real in their application to our daily practice. She also presented a session on the Transformation of Nursing Leadership reminding us of the challenges and expectations for nurses with the change resulting from the Affordable Care Act and the report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on the Future of Nursing.

Margaret and Susan Laffan teamed up to give four presentations throughout the conference. These included sessions on the cardiovascular examination, understanding lab values and critical thinking as part of nursing process. As usual with these two presenters, the sessions were full of practical information, fun and door prizes as well.

Margaret and Susan joined with Sue Medley-Lane for a session on Rejuvenation of Nursing Spirit. For Susan Laffan, rejuvenation comes when she dons her pink fuzzy slippers which you will sometimes see her smoozing around the conference in. These presenters discussed the demands of life that can contribute to a loss of spirit and ways to mitigate the cumulative effect of these experiences. They asked correctional nurses to tell the stories and describe the experiences that have inspired their commitment to the field and will collect these and send the collection back out to participants. If you have a story or experience that has been your inspiration for correctional nursing send it to njjailnurse@aol.com by November 30, 2014. The story must include your name, your state and your email address. It should be no more than 300 words long and the names of any patients in the story should be changed.

If you have some ideas about what you think the guidelines for nursing management of chronic care should include or subjects that should be covered please respond in the comments section of this post. If you have an inspirational story about correctional nursing that you would like to share please send it to Susan Laffan at njjailnurse@aol.com by November 30, 2014.

For more on correctional nursing read our book, the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order your copy directly from the publisher. Use promotional code AF1209 for $15 off and free shipping.

One thought on “What’s new and news

  1. As you summarized, the NCCHC Conference was memorable in many ways. Chef Jeff set the stage for the vision of what our work is all about–Helping others to heal themselves. He is an inspiration. The many sessions on correctional nursing were progressive, professional and presented by dedicated nurses. It is a joy to have leaders in correctional nursing who are taking nursing into its own practice with standards and best practices. Thank you to each of you who took your time and talent to share with us.

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