What are these eight rights anyway?

The picture posted with this column of a nurse on her way to give medications gives rise to many thoughtsNurse Medication Picture and memories. For me, it brings memories of my early years in nursing practice.  We wore white uniforms, white shoes, white nylons and white caps.  . I remember learning how to safely and accurately administer medications through each of the steps from the physician’s order to setting up medications, to administration and documentation. I also remember how much emphasis was placed on giving the right patient the right medications. Like the nurse in the picture, medication rounds were done using a tray holding medication in cups and small cards with the patient information and medication on them.

Years later, the safety of administering medications was outlined in the Five Rights of Medication Administration.  I cannot tell from the literature when these became formalized but when I returned to school in the mid 1980’s, the Five Rights were prominent in nursing practice, risk management and patient safety.

Health Care Advances

As the body of knowledge for nursing practice evolves, we continuously improve our practice to assure our patients receive the highest level of care with an emphasis on patient safety and error reduction. Because of this, three more rights have been added to the body of knowledge for medication administration, making a total of eight rights.

In corrections settings, medication administration is completed by a variety of job classifications. No matter who gives medications to patients, they must be qualified and trained in medication administration and follow the Eight Rights, as described below:

  1. Right Patient: check the name on the medication administration record (MAR), use two identifiers; ask patient to identify themselves, check name &/or picture on ID wrist band or badge.
  2. Right Medication: check the order, select medication, compare to the order, check the MAR, and then check the medication against the MAR before giving to the patient. If it is a new medication does the patient know what it is for and are there any allergies that would contradict giving it.
  3. Right Dose: check the order or the MAR, confirm the appropriateness of the dose, for medications with high risk consequences from dosing errors have someone double check the calculation.
  4. Right Route: check the order and MAR, confirm the route is the correct for that medication and dose, confirm that the patient can receive it by the ordered route.
  5. Right Time: check frequency the medication is to be given on the MAR and the time is correct for this dose, confirm when the last dose was given.
  6. Right Documentation: document administration AFTER giving the medication, document the route, time and other specifics such as site, if injectable, lab value, pain scale or other data as appropriate.
  7. Right Reason: confirm the rationale for the ordered medication; why is it prescribed, does the patient know why they are taking this medication. If they have been taking it for long is its continued use justified?
  8. Right Response: has the drug had its desired effect, does the patient verbalize improvement in symptoms, and does the patient think there is a need for an adjustment in the medication?  Document your monitoring of the patient for intended and unintended effects.

Adapted from Bonsall, L. M. (2011). 8 rights of medication administration. Retrieved June 17, 2016 from http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2011/8-rights-of-medication-administration

The Important Three

When you examine the new three rights closely, their importance becomes clear and explains why they are included as best practices:

  • Right Documentation:  We hear from our legal representatives, instructors, managers and peers, that “if it was not documented, it was not done”. No excuses can make up for a patient receiving double dose of medications when it was not documented or a provider changing a medication when they thought a patient was not taking the medication. Besides accurate and timely documentation of medications administered, this right also includes the accurate documentation of the order on the MAR.
  • Right Reason: When taking off orders or preparing to administer a medication, knowing why the patient is taking a medication is the foundation for patient education and evaluating the effects of the treatment. This is especially important when a particular medication, such as gabapentin, may be ordered to address one of several different conditions (seizure, nerve pain, restless leg syndrome etc.). Information in the patient’s chart will often clarify why this medication is being ordered; if not, consult the provider so that you know what the patient can expect from the treatment.
  • Right Response: We cannot effectively teach a patient about a certain medication and the desired effects of treatment if we do not know the drug ourselves.  Knowing about medications is a continual learning process, which grows day by day.  Make a habit of learning about new drugs each day.  This information can be found in the drug reference books kept in the medication room, by talking with providers, consult with the pharmacist, discussing medications at shift or team reports and exchanging information with team members.  See also a previous post that describes all of the online drug references that are available without charge.

Spread the Word about the 8

Even though these additional best practices have been discussed in the literature and have been topics in nursing education for several years, I still hear nurses refer to the Five Rights. They are called rights because they are not a request or desire—but a RIGHT. Each one of the eight rights is fundamental to nursing practice and when used together better promote patient care and enhance safety. By following these steps, nurses promote wellness and identify and prevent harm to our patients. What do the eight rights of medication administration mean to you?  How has understanding the eight rights in your practice, improved your patients care?  Share your experiences and challenges with medication administration in the comment section below.

Read more about correctional nursing in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

Photo credit:  Yahoo Images

 

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