Antibiotic Stewardship has Four Rights

stewardship photo

The subject of antibiotic stewardship was touched upon in last week’s post about Superbugs. The goal of these programs is to avoid unnecessary and inappropriate use of antibiotics to prevent development of antibiotic resistant disease organisms. In addition to curing illness, appropriate antibiotic use should also reduce side effects of medications and lower health care costs.

Inpatient settings, such as hospitals and long term care, have had programs in place to monitor the use of antibiotics for some time. In 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), launched the “Get Smart for Health Care Campaign  ” to promote the improved use of antibiotics.  The Joint Commission and the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) have also come out with recommendations, guidelines and tool kits for health care settings to begin their own stewardship programs.

Correctional facilities are also patient care settings

A study by the CDC indicates that 30-50% of antibiotics prescribed in hospitals are unnecessary or inappropriate. How does that translate to corrections health? The article states that overprescribing and mis-prescribing is contributing to the development of antibiotic resistant bacteria and challenges from side effects of antibiotic use. Of all the health care settings, corrections health is probably the most cautious in prescribing medications for patients because our patients come from an “medication dependent culture”, whether legal or illegal.  Many corrections health programs have policies, procedures and clinical protocol to guide the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of the most common antibiotic resistant conditions, such as methicillin resistant staph aureus (MRSA), resistant tuberculosis and gonorrhea. Even with these practices in place, are correctional health care programs able to assert that all antibiotic use is appropriate? Probably not.

The fundamental four rights

The goal of antibiotic stewardship has four points to ensure that patients being treated for infectious conditions receive:

  • the right antibiotic
  • at the right dose
  • at the right time and
  • for the right duration

Most correctional health programs already have in place the components of an antibiotic monitoring system. The existing quality improvement (CQI) program or pharmacy and therapeutics (P & T) committee should include monitoring of appropriate antibiotic use among the subjects reviewed. Staff to lead the effort could include the staff or consulting pharmacist, the medical director or other provider, infectious disease specialist or nurse, or one of the staff responsible for medication administration. By using existing resources and interest, it is possible to initiate antibiotic stewardship at your facility, no matter how large or how small.

Common guidelines to ensure antibiotic stewardship

Practical advice for implementation of antibiotic stewardship include these recommendations from the Infectious Disease Society of America, which can be translated into any setting:

  • Pre-authorization or review of orders for targeted antibiotics with consultation provided about alternatives.
  • If pre-authorization or consultation is not available, after two or three days of treatment review the patient’s response to treatment and adjust treatment accordingly.
  • Conduct a continuous quality improvement study or audit of patient response to treatment with antibiotics to identify areas to target for improvement.
  • Timely diagnostic services, especially for respiratory specimens, aids in the determination of whether antibiotics are necessary.
  • Use of standard protocols for specific diagnoses or syndromes to guide the assessment, treatment and evaluation of the patient’s response to treatment.

Corrections health reflects the community.

Correctional health care is consistent with and supportive of health care in the community. With statistics like 23,000 deaths per year in the US from antibiotic resistance, stewardship and oversight of antibiotic use has become the community norm.  The safety of our patients and in essence the community, requires that we attend to the appropriate use of antibiotics in the correctional health care setting as well.

If your facility has an antibiotic oversight or stewardship program, please share your experience with us by replying in the comment section of this article.  Next week will examine the Bureau of Prisons’ antibiotics stewardship program and the role of nursing!

 

Photo credit:www.U.S.fotolia.com/#86136484/antibiotics

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