Thanksgiving

Graphic typographic montage illustration of the word Thanksgiving composed of associated terms and defining words in neutral tones. A pair of autumn leaves completes this dramatic, inspirational design.

This week we celebrate Thanksgiving, an American holiday to give thanks for the abundance of the previous year and the fall harvest. Many, but not all of us, get together with family and friends to enjoy a meal and the company of others as fall turns to winter. Some of us will be working, sharing the holiday with our colleagues and patients. No matter what specific plans we each have for the holiday, it is a time of reflection, to identify and give voice to that for which we are thankful.

Lorry, Gayle and I are thankful for you, the readers of the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Lorry wrote the first post almost five years ago just as we finished editing, our text, The Essentials of Correctional Nursing. We have posted a new blog nearly every week since then. We are grateful to Gayle for joining our blogging adventure this past year and enjoy her take on issues in correctional nursing.

Our purpose in writing the blog is to amplify the material included in the book and to further explore new and recurrent issues in correctional nursing practice. Our most frequently viewed posts address the subjects of delegation, certification in correctional nursing, vital signs, withdrawal, spiritual distress, the ANA Scope and standards of professional practice, and evidence-based practice. As we look back over our files we are thankful for the opportunity the blog has given us to explore subjects in depth.

Day by day, week by week, year by year our readership has grown. We average over 150 hits on the blog every day and have had over 300 hits on some days. Our readership is from all over the world and we have benefited from our contact with correctional nurses from all across the globe. We have more than 200 regular subscribers on email, over 4,000 on Twitter and more than 700 on Facebook. Thank you for your interest and support for the Essentials of Correctional Nursing.

We published The Essentials of Correctional Nursing in 2012, along with eight contributing authors, to reflect the distinguishing features and practices of this specialty in the field of nursing. In doing so we benefited from the support of many colleagues who peer reviewed the manuscript and offered insight about issues in correctional nursing. The text has since been recommended as a resource applicants use to study for certification in correctional nursing. Lorry also has written a series of posts on this blog about how to study for the certification exam and her own journey becoming certified. We are grateful for the growing legion of nurses who are certified in correctional nursing; you are the voice of the profession! If you are not yet certified, perhaps this could be your goal for the new year. It is easier than you think and there are many benefits.

At the end of every year Lorry and I discuss how we are doing with the blog and decide whether to continue and if so, what subjects we are going to tackle in the coming year. This year we decided that with other opportunities and commitments, it is time to move on and no longer will post on the Essentials of Correctional Nursing blog. However we are maintaining the site and the collection of 220 or so posts as a continuing resource for correctional nurses. Next week’s post will be the last and includes a table of contents so that each of our previous posts can be easily accessed from this page!

We continue to support correctional nursing practice through our writing, consulting, and speaking. Here are some helpful links to other correctional nurse resources that we support and endorse:

CorrectionalNurse.Net Blog

Correctional Nursing Today Podcast

CorrectCare Magazine

The Essentials of Correctional Nursing can be ordered directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!  Lorry and I, or any of the contributing authors, are always glad to sign and personalize your copy of the text.

Have a safe and grateful holiday!

Photo credit: © gdarts- Fotolia.com

Remembering Meaningful Milestones

ncchc-40th-celebrationThe National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) held its national conference in Las Vegas last week (October 24th through the 26th).  For the over 1600 attendees, it was a recognition of the profession of correctional health care and the path from the beginning to present day.

40 Years of Educational Offerings

For 40 years, NCCHC has been offering educational opportunities during four educational sessions each year. Edward Harrison CCHP, former NCCHC president was at this conference to bestow some awards and meet friends. His words reflect some of the highlights accomplished along the way.

  • Correctional health care providers were caregivers for AIDS patients before the disease had a name and before many in community health care settings overcame their fear of the disease.
  • Although decades ago telemedicine was widely promoted throughout the country, it advanced in correctional health settings more so than in many community environments.
  • Treating sexually transmitted and other infectious diseases in the community often relies on the interventions provided patients in the correctional system .
  • Correctional systems picked up the slack when community mental health programs lost their funding.
  • Health care for all, regardless of one’s ability to pay, was the established practice in corrections 30 years before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

During the conference the foundation of correctional health and the early leaders were recognized.  To add to our recognitions, nothing is more noteworthy than our next celebrated milestone.

Estelle vs Gamble- 40 Years Ago

The 40 year milestone of this court case, which is considered the basis for correctional healthcare, forces us to reflect on the advancement of quality care that today is provided across the country to all our detainees. This court case forced everyone to look at care in the jails and prisons across the country and build health care delivery systems that were comprised of qualified health professionals, identified illness, treated disease and prevented harm and suffering.

Estelle vs Gamble is a case brought forward by a prisoner in Texas in 1976. Even though the state “lost” the case, the decisions by the courts provided the foundation for care of all prisoners and the basis of deliberate indifference. During initial orientation, each new employee in correctional health care hears about Estelle vs Gamble and learns that detainees have:

  • The right to access health care in all settings.
  • The right to a professional medical opinion
  • The right to the care that is ordered.

The first standard in the NCCHC’s Accreditation Standards is “Access to Care”. The discussion states that “this standard intends to ensure that inmates have access to care to meet their serious health needs and is the principle on which all National Commission on Correctional Health Care standards are based. It is also the basic principle established by the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1976 landmark case Estelle v. Gamble.” (A-01, 2014 standards, page 3)

Remembering the foundations of correctional health, will provide us with a vision that expands the quality of health care and integrates us into the communities in which we practice.

Certified Correctional Health Professional (CCHP) for 25 Years

The third celebration was to honor the 25 years that the special certification for correctional health professional has been in place. Before 1991, a group of correctional health leaders, worked to develop a test that would reflect the unique challenges and foundation upon which correctional health is practiced across the country. Other health care specialties already had in place specific  certifications, such as ICU nurses, emergency nurses, IV nurses and some mental health specialties. These certifications recognize the knowledge base and competencies required in a specific field or specialty area of practice.

The first CCHP exam was in 1991 and was a take home exam with multiple choice and essay questions. At the conference, we honored 17 CCHP’s who completed the test in 1991 and are still certified today.

As the years have progressed, the test has expanded to a proctored exam at various conferences and sites.  Also other exams for specialties within correctional health have been developed. After you obtain your CCHP certification you may add to your credentials by taking a specialty exam. These include the CCHP-RN, CCHP-Physician, CCHP-Mental Health and CCHP-Advanced.  Achieving professional certification is the surest way to demonstrate that you have the qualifications and expertise to meet the challenges of delivering correctional health care in any setting.

As we go through our daily work, it is good to take time to reflect on how we achieved this proud and important professional career, and all the people who came before us and showed the dedication and leadership to improve care and show us the way.

Do have a reflection on the history of correctional health care that you would like to share? Please reply in the comments sections of this post.

Read more about legal foundations of correctional health care and the professional organizations that support correctional nursing in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

Photo Credit: NCCHC,org, education and conferences link

The B. Jaye Anno Award for Excellence in Communication

Lorry Schoenly with B. Jaye Anno

Lorry Schoenly with B. Jaye Anno

On Monday, October 28, 2013 Lorry Schoenly received the B. Jaye Anno Award of Excellence in Communication at the opening ceremony of the 30th annual National Conference on Correctional Health Care. This award honors innovative, well-executed communications that have had a positive impact on the field of correctional health care. Lorry is the first nurse to receive this prestigious award and she received a huge round of applause from the audience. The award is named after our beloved Jaye Anno, the co-founder of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) and she attended the ceremony to present the award to Lorry.

The award acknowledged Lorry’s use of “new” media to bring resources to health care providers working in correctional health care. These include the text, Essentials of Correctional Nursing and this accompanying blog post, also CorrectionalNurse.net, and podcasts on Correctional Nursing Today. Each of these media sources are dedicated to bringing practical, down to earth resources to nurses specializing in the field of correctional nursing. Lorry was also recognized as a frequent contributor of articles to various peer reviewed journals as well as the periodicals CorrectCare, CorrectionsOne.com, and Corrections Today. Further she has made her wit, inspiration and advice available on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn and can be counted on to respond practically 24/7 to professionals in the field.

In accepting the award Lorry recounted that it was by being open to new ideas and experiences that she discovered correctional nursing in the first place. This was also how she discovered “new media”, a term used to include all forms of electronic communication. She dreamed that it could be used to reach out to many more people in the field, especially those who were grappling with how to provide health care in correctional facilities. One example she gave, was about a nurse who is the only health care provider at a jail. The nurse contacted Lorry on Facebook because she was looking for ways to help prisoners who had difficulty sleeping. Through email, they discussed sleep hygiene measures and other aides that might be made available at the jail and started a relationship that continues today, even though they have never met face to face. To hear a clip from her acceptance speech, please click on this link http://correctionalnurse.net/landing/2013-b-jaye-anno-award-of-excellence-in-communication/

It was just a year ago when Lorry and I celebrated the publication of the Essentials of Correctional Nursing with our contributing authors, nurse experts and peer reviewers at the NCCHC Conference in Las Vegas.  This year nearly all these nurses were in the audience applauding Lorry’s accomplishment. Take a moment to reflect on Lorry’s point, that when we are open to new ideas and experiences we can transform our present circumstances to accomplish the aspirations we have for the future. What do you dream of accomplishing in your future as a correctional nurse?

Send Lorry congratulations for her vision and perseverance in the pursuit of transformative ideas that is honored by this award by replying to this post or directly at http://www.facebook.com/lorryschoenly .  By the way, all the copies of the Essentials of Correctional Nursing in the bookstore at NCCHC sold out by noon on Sunday, eighteen hours before the opening ceremony when Lorry received the B. Jaye Anno Award of Excellence in Communication.  However copies can still be ordered directly from the publisher and if you use Promo Code AF1209 the price is discounted by $15 off and shipping is free.