Stay at home ways to build continuing education credits

Man sitting at a computer, learning at home.

I have a friend recently who was lamenting that personal circumstances did not allow her attendance at the National Conference on Correctional Health Care that took place in Dallas Texas this week. She was worried that she would not have enough continuing education hours to satisfy the requirements for recertification as a Certified Correctional Health Professional (CCHP). In addition to professional recertification, many states require evidence of continuing education when nurses renew their license. There are times when life events or circumstances make attending a conference or other educational activity just impossible and then we worry about having enough CEs. This post is written to provide information about some CE resources that can be done at home and are free or inexpensive.

CCHPs and CCHP-RNs recertify once each year. In addition to the renewal fee of $75 the applicant must attest to having obtained 18 hours of continuing education of which 6 hours are specific to correctional health care. CCHPs and CCHP-RNs should maintain a record of the continuing education that they have attested to, in case they are audited. One way to do this is to keep a CE log that includes the following information:

Your name Date Title or subject # of hours

In addition to conference attendance, continuing education credit may be obtained by attending in-service at a correctional facility, writing an article for a journal, or making a presentation at a conference. Another way to obtain CEUs that may be more practical or achievable when life becomes hectic is self-study or independent learning. The following are some self-study options:

The Journal of Correctional Health Care is provided free as one of the benefits to CCHPs and CCHP-RNs. The Journal is published four times each year and contains six to ten scholarly, peer reviewed articles that are specific to correctional health care. If you are not certified an annual subscription costs $125 so this is a tangible return on the investment in certification. You can earn 1 continuing education credit for each article if you complete a corresponding exam. Any article published by the Journal of Correctional Health Care within the previous two years is eligible for continuing education credit. All of this material would meet the requirement of CCHP for 6 hours specific to correctional health care. For more information about this resource go to this link http://www.ncchc.org/journal-of-correctional-health-care.

Medscape is another resource for continuing education credit. This site offers clinicians access to timely clinical information and educational tools to stay current in practice. There is no cost to join and you can access resources that are selected specifically for nurses. For example 0.25 contact hours can be obtained for previewing a slide show and web discussion about motivational interviewing, behavioral action and collaborative care in Strategies for Effective Communication with Patients with Major Depression. There is an easy to use CE Tracker that will keep track of the courses and credits accumulated through the year which can be saved or printed out as necessary. This last year I took two classes, one on the guidelines for prevention of bedsores and the other on prescribing antibiotics and both were easy to access, informative and the exam very simple. For more information about this website go to this link: http://www.medscape.org/

The American Nurses Association is a favorite on-line resource of mine for continuing education. You do have to belong, but an on-line membership only costs $45 a year. Membership benefits include three publications, American Nurse Today, The American Nurse, and the Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. There also is a large library of on-line courses with continuing education credit that can be accessed when it is convenient for you.  I have taken several courses from ANA this year, including a session on the new ethical guidelines for nurses, a course on preventing medication errors and another on the JNC guidelines for managing hypertension. As a member I receive announcements of upcoming Webinars that are offered with continuing education credit and at no charge. This year I took a whole series on building a healthy workplace. Go to this link to find out more about the continuing education resources through the American Nurses Association: http://www.nursingworld.org/JoinANA/E-Membership-Only.

These three resources offer thousands of continuing education hours without ever having to leave your home. Most can be obtained either free or as a benefit of being a CCHP or CCHP-RN. So when time or circumstances make it impossible to access continuing education credits at conferences or on the job, these options may be a help. In my case I’ve chosen to access continued learning through these sites even though I have been able to attend conferences and in-service programs this year.

Do you have resources for continuing education that you would like to share with other correctional nurses? If so, please tell us about them by replying in the comments section of this post.

For more about continuing education in correctional nursing see Chapters 17 Management and Leadership as well as Chapter 19 Professional Practice in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

 

Photo credit: © ponomarenko13 – Fotolia.com

Best of the Blog #3 – New Scope and Standards of Practice for Correctional Nursing

We searched through the stacks of almost 200 blog posts to pull out the most popular ones for this series. If you are new to the Essentials of Correctional Nursing Blog you may have missed some good reads. Enjoy!

This post, written by Catherine Knox, originally aired June 14, 2013.

On May 27, 2013 the American Nurses Association (ANA) published the new edition of Correctional Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice (2013).  These are broad parameters defining our specialty area of practice that transcend geographic location (south, east, west, midwest), type of employer (public/private, jail, prison, detention center), and the various populations served in correctional health care (sentenced, unsentenced, juvenile, female etc.).  The standards define who, what, where, when, why and how of nursing practice (ANA, 2010, p.2). The ANA standards are used to:

  • inform nurses and others about correctional nursing practice
  • guide nurse’s day- to- day practice and resolve conflicts
  • develop policy and procedure and other governance of  professional practice
  • reflect on professional practice and plan improvement

Correctional nursing was first acknowledged as a specialty practice by the ANA in 1985. At that time, the first standards for the specialty were published as: Standards of Nursing Practice in Correctional Facilities. Since 1985 the standards for correctional nursing have been revised four times.  This revision was the result of collaboration among seventeen correctional nursing leaders representing various settings and organizations. Input from correctional nurses was sought at various conferences, by survey, and during a public comment period over a period of eighteen months. The input from practicing nurses was incorporated into the description of the scope of correctional nursing practice.

Patricia Voermans MS, RN, APN, CCHP-RN, chairperson of the task force described this edition as “expanding the description of the patient population and addressing the challenges of delivering evidenced based care in the correctional setting.  It also discusses the evolving role of nurses in coordinating care, developing policy and continuing leadership in correctional health care” (April 22, 2013).

Correctional nursing is defined as… “the protection, promotion and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response, advocacy, and delivery of health care to individuals, families, communities, and populations under the jurisdiction of the criminal justice system” (ANA, 2013).  It is the location of nursing care, with its unique population demographics, environmental constraints and ethical dilemmas that defines our specialty practice (Voermans, Schoenly & Knox, April 22, 2013).

There are sixteen standards of correctional nursing practice in the new edition. The first six standards delineate the steps used in the nursing process. The next ten standards define the professional role of nurses in the correctional setting. This edition emphasizes the importance of communication and collaboration in the delivery of safe and effective patient care. The areas covered by the standards are listed in the table below.

Table 1: Scope & Standards of Practice for Correctional Nurses
     Practice      Professional   Performance
1. Assessment 7. Ethics
2. Diagnosis 8. Education
3. Outcomes Identification 9. Evidence-Based Practice and Research
4. Planning 10. Quality of Practice
5. Implementation 11. Communication
6. Evaluation 12. Leadership
13. Collaboration
14. Professional Practice Evaluation
15. Resource Utilization
16. Environmental Health

Correctional nursing: Scope and standards of practice. (2013). 2nd Edition. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Each standard is further defined by the competencies registered nurses and graduate-level prepared or advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) are expected to demonstrate in meeting the standard. Competency is defined as the integration of knowledge, skills, abilities and judgment needed to achieve an expected level of performance (White & O’Sullivan 2012). The registered nurse is responsible for maintaining professional competence and accountable for each of the decisions made in their nursing practice.

Standard 16 on Environmental Health is a new standard and requires the correctional registered nurse to practice in an environmentally safe and healthy manner. Environmental health is the assessment and control of factors in the environment that can potentially affect health.  Two of the competencies of the correctional registered nurse in this area of practice are:

  • Knowledge of environmental health concepts, with implementation of environmental health strategies.
  • Reducing environmental health risks for workers, patients, and others in the correctional setting.

To experience how the ANA standards are applied in day to day practice they have been interwoven into every chapter of the Essentials of Correctional Nursing which can be ordered directly from the publisher. If you use Promo Code AF1209 the price is discounted by $15 off and shipping is free.

Copies of Correctional Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, 2nd Edition (2013) can be ordered from the ANA at http://nursesbooks.org/Homepage/Hot-off-the-Press/Correctional-Nursing-2nd.aspx. When you receive your copy of the new edition of the ANA standards one suggestion is to assess your competency to practice in conformance with each of the standards.  Select one or more areas that you would like to improve and develop a plan to do so.

We will share more about how to use the standards in correctional nursing practice in future posts.  In the meantime what experiences have you had applying the ANA Correctional Nursing: Scope and standards in your daily practice?  What tools or resources did you find most helpful? Please share your experience and advice in the comments section of this post.

References:

American Nurses Association. (1985). Standards of nursing practice in correctional facilities. Washington, DC: American Nurses Association.

American Nurses Association. (2013). Correctional nursing scope and standards of practice. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Schoenly, L. (2013). Overview of Correctional Nursing. In Schoenly, L. & Knox, C. Essentials of Correctional Nursing. New York: Springer.

Voermans, P., Knox, C., Schoenly, L. (April 22, 2013). Correctional Nursing: Applying the New Scope and Standards of Practice. NCCHC Spring Conference 2013, Denver, Co. Accessed May 8, 2013 at http://ncchc.sclivelearningcenter.com/index.aspx?PID=4622&SID=172421

White, K., O’Sullivan, A. (2012). The Essential Guide to Nursing Practice: Applying ANAs Scope and Standards in Practice and Education. American Nurses Association. Silver Springs, MD.

Photo Credit:  American Nurses Association NSPS’10_Fig 4  Nursing Process  Stds

Knowledge Resources for Medication Management

ReadingThe American Nurses Association statement on the scope of practice for correctional nurses requires that nurses be knowledgeable of the medications administered, including dosages, side effects, contraindications and allergies. Nurses also must be able to teach and coach patients so that they know what medications they are taking, the correct dose and frequency (2013). Many more drugs have been developed to effectively treat a wider variety of conditions in the last several decades and new drug formulations established which reduce treatment time, improve adherence and reduce the burden of side effects. With the proliferation of treatment choices available to prescribers today, the scope of knowledge required of nurses has expanded as well.

The types of health problems presented by our patients during incarceration is very broad therefore correctional nurses must maintain more expansive knowledge about the drugs likely to be prescribed than nurses who specialize their practice to a certain acuity (e.g., critical care) or particular health problem (e.g., kidney dialysis). It is impossible to memorize all this information so what references should a nurse use to aid their knowledge about medications these days? What are the drug references that you use?

A couple years ago another nurse and I were talking about a patient and one of the drugs that had been prescribed. I went in search of the big red text from the American Hospital Formulary Service. He turned to the computer and typed the drug’s name into Wikipedia and before I left the room he had the information we were looking for.  The problem is that anyone can contribute information to Wikipedia and so the accuracy and completeness of drug information on this site has been examined. Drug information on Wikipedia relies most heavily on news articles and commercial websites rather than evidence-based material and the information, especially that which is safety related is not reliably updated (Koppen, Phillips & Papageorgiou 2015).

Nurses in one survey in the U.S. favored using the Physician’s Drug Reference (PDR) or a text written especially for nurses like Lippincott’s Nursing Drug Handbook (Gettig 2007). In another survey nurses reported that, other than the PDR, they relied most on other colleagues in the workplace. The problem with relying on co-workers for information about drugs is that the individual may not be available or authoritative on the subject. Access to information and ease of use were the most important factors in nurses’ choice of drug information resources so that quick and concise answers could be obtained (Ndosi & Newell 2010). As drug information has become more available in electronic format it can be more quickly accessed and is becoming a more reliable reference for busy correctional nurses.

The following is a list of drug references and applications that are available on line and can be obtained for free:

National Library of Medicine has three databases that are useful for nurses in medication management. The first is the Drug Information Portal which provides information on 53,000 drugs from government agencies and scientific journals. The second is Drugs, Herbs and Supplements providing information for patients about the purpose of drugs, correct dosages, side effects and potential interactions with dietary supplements and herbal remedies. Last is a database designed for use in emergencies and developed to help identify unlabeled pills called Pillbox.

Epocrates is one of the most widely used and highly recommended drug references. In addition to drug information the basic package which is free has a dose calculator, drug-drug interaction checker which includes OTC medication and a pill identification program. For an annual fee the program can be upgraded to access medical information, diagnostic information, a medical dictionary and infectious disease guidelines.

Medscape Mobile is a combination medical reference and drug database. In addition to clinical reference for 8,000 drugs, herbals and supplements it includes a robust drug-drug interaction checker and a dosage calculator.

A final resource that should be available at every correctional facility is the telephone number for the poison control center. This is a national hotline number (1 800 222-1212) which connects to the nearest poison control center. Most poison exposures can be treated locally if contact is made with a poison control center because they are staffed 24 hours seven days a week by health care professionals with special training. The facility should also stock a supply of antidotes for various types of poison. A consensus guideline published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine (2009) recommended stocking 12 antidotes available for immediate use in treatment (2009). Since then several poison control centers have lists on-line of recommended antidotes to have on hand.

Availability of antidotes is a decision that should be made by the facility medical director in consultation with the supplying pharmacy. Usually they are stored with other emergency medications. Nurses should be familiar with each antidote stocked at the facility for use in medical emergency care. Here is a link to a list of common drugs and antidotes that nurses should know about.

Are there any knowledge resources for nurses in managing medications that are not described here and should be? Please let us know about them by responding in the comments section of this post. For more about the opportunities and challenges in correctional nursing order a copy of our book, Essentials of Correctional Nursing directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

References

ANA (2013). Correctional Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. Silver Springs: American Nurses Association.

Dart, R.C., Borron, S.W., Caravati, E. M., et.al. (2009) Expert consensus guidelines for stocking of antidotes in hospitals that provide emergency care. Annals of Emergency Medicine 54 (3): 386-394.

Gettig, J.P. (2007). Drug information availability and preferences of health care professionals in Illinois: A pilot survey study. Drug Information Journal 42, 263-272.

Koppen, L., Phillips, J., Papageorgiou, R. (2015) Analysis of reference sources used in drug-related Wikipedia articles. Journal of the Medical Library Association 103 (3), 140- 144.

Ndosi, M. & Newell, R. (2010). Medicine information sources used by nurses at the point of care. Journal of Clinical Nursing 19, 2659-2661.

Photo credit: © Xuejun li – Fotolia.com

An overview of medication management in correctional settings

Isolated, whitespace, copyspace.

The roles and responsibilities of correctional nurses for medication management are broader in scope than other practice settings. In health care settings many other professional and support personnel contribute to delivery of patient care.  However in correctional facilities nurses are relied upon to deliver care without the availability of these other types of personnel. The result is that correctional nurses often work in professional isolation and may feel like they are in a foreign country (Muse, 2012). I think traveling in a foreign country is a good analogy for correctional nursing. Doing this well involves preparation by learning something about the sights to see, building skill using a little of the language, familiarizing yourself with the rules, particularly which side of the road people drive on and finding out how to avoid being robbed or harmed in some way. The thrill of correctional nursing, like the thrill of foreign travel, comes when you realize how much you are enjoying it, especially the independence of professional nursing practice in this field. This post is the first part of a guidebook for your journey managing medication in correctional settings.

State law, rule and regulation

State law serves as the basis for nearly all of the practices and procedures involved in medication management. Most nurses are familiar with the nurse practice act in their state. If not, this is the place to start by reviewing it for definitions and references to medication. The nurse practice act will be especially helpful in describing the training and supervision requirements if non-licensed personnel, such as nursing assistants, administer medication at the correctional facility.

The pharmacy practice act is the most important resource to review. These laws will define how to obtain, store, dispense and account for medication which are often the responsibility of nurses when there is no pharmacist on site.  Even if there is a pharmacist at the facility, being familiar with the law that governs their practice is helpful in understanding the recommendations pharmacists make about drug storage, packaging of medications and accountability.

The medical practice act provides important information about how a physician’s order for medication is lawfully carried out. The medical practice act also has information about how medical assistants and paramedics work as well as the requirements for training and supervision which need to be followed if these personnel are involved in medication management.

This is not interesting reading but it does provide information that nurses can use in determining the responsibilities of personnel for medication management. It also provides definitions and terminology to accurately communicate with the pharmacy that provides medication to the facility and with providers about implementation of orders. Finally it provides nurses a basis to knowledgably resist inappropriate requests from custody and other personnel not familiar with health care laws to carry out tasks that are inconsistent with state law.

Accreditation standards

The National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) and the American Correctional Association (ACA) are organizations which accredit correctional facilities for providing services and programs consistent with national standards. The standards are also used by most correctional facilities in developing policy and practices even if accreditation is not sought. Both organizations have standards related to medication management which are summarized in Figure 1. This list is a handy description of all the moving parts and pieces of medication management in correctional settings and nurses are involved in all of these components. This list can be used to review how medication management is handled at a facility and identify areas that may need attention.

Figure 1:   Standards for medication management in correctional facilities
NCCHC ACA
Applicable standards C-05, D-01, D-02 4-4378, 4-4379
1. Facility operates in compliance with state and federal laws regarding medications. Similar
2. There is a formulary and method to obtain non-formulary medication. Similar
3. Policy and procedures address how to procure, receive and account, dispense, distribute, store, administer and dispose medication. Similar
4. Medications are under control of appropriate staff and accounted for. Secure storage and perpetual inventory of controlled substances, syringes and needles.
5. Medication is only prescribed as clinically indicated after provider evaluation. Similar
6. Providers are notified of medication needing renewal prior to expiration. Similar
7. Staff are properly trained to administer or distribute medication. Similar
8. Inmates do not prepare, dispense, or administer medications. Self-carry medication programs are allowed.
9. There are no outdated, discontinued, or recalled medications at the facility.
10. If there is no on-site pharmacist, a consulting pharmacist is available for advice and makes inspections of the facility’s medication program at least quarterly.

Nursing standards

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has recognized correctional nursing as a specialized field of practice since 1995. The ANA publishes a reference that describes the scope and sets standards for the practice of correctional nurses. With regard to medication management the role and responsibility of correctional nurses is as follows:

  1. To be knowledgeable of medications administered, including dosages, side effects, contraindications and food and drug allergies.
  2. Practices with regard to medication management in the correctional setting meet the same standards as in the community. To do so nurses must be knowledgeable about state practice acts (as suggested earlier in this chapter).
  3. Ensure that patients know what medications they are taking, the correct dosage and potential side effects.
  4. If patients are expected to take medications without supervision the nurse evaluates the patient’s competence to self-manage and takes steps to protect those who are not competent to do so.
  5. Work with custody staff so that patients receive medication in a timely and safe manner (ANA, 2013).

This overview makes me reflect on my first experience with medication management in correctional nursing. I was being oriented to administer medications on the evening shift at a maximum custody men’s prison. A technician rolled a grocery cart filled with stock bottles of all kinds of medication out to me. The cart was full. In giving me the cart he said “You roll this along the tier and stop at every cell. Ask the inmates what meds they want. When you give them the medication then you record it on one of these index cards that has the medication listed at the top.” I remember being shocked and asked the technician why they did it that way. He shrugged his shoulders and went on with his tasks. While this experience is pretty extreme you might use it to review against the ANA nursing standards of practice, the accreditation standards and state law that were reviewed in this post and identify the inconsistencies. Being knowledgeable about the standards and requirements for medication management prevents erosion of professional practice and ultimately protects patients from harm.

Going back to the travel analogy, knowing state law, the national standards for correctional facilities as well as the standards of practice for correctional nurses is like having a guidebook to review the sights to see in place you have selected to travel to. These become a reference point to plan so you can make the most of your time as well as an expectation for what will take place while on your journey.

Is medication management a troublesome area where you practice correctional nursing? Have you looked at the problem through the lens of applicable state law, corrections standards and the nursing practice standards? If so, what have you identified as the problem areas? Please comment by responding in the comments section of this post.

For more about the opportunities and challenges in correctional nursing order a copy of our book, Essentials of Correctional Nursing directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

 

References

ANA (2013). Correctional Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. Silver Springs: American Nurses Association.

Muse, M. (2012). Professional role and responsibility. In C. Schoenly L. & Knox, Essentials of Correctional Nursing (pp. 364-377). New York: Springer.

National Commission on Correctional Health Care. (2014). Standards for Health Services. Chicago: National Commission on Correctional Health Care.

American Correctional Association. Performance Based Standards for Correctional Health Care. Retrieved August 19, 2015 from http://www.aca.org/standards/healthcare/

Photo credit: © BillionPhotos.com – Fotolia.com

How punishment affects our practice

Close-up Of Brown Gavel And Medical Stethoscope

Currently I am working on understanding more about the challenges of providing culturally competent nursing care in correctional settings. The population of patients we serve are not only culturally diverse but also some racial and ethnic groups are disproportionately represented. Many will agree that the prison, jail or detention facility is a culture as well, the culture of incarceration. Culture is described by Madeline Leininger, a well-known nursing theorist as “the learned, shared, and transmitted values, beliefs, norms, and lifeways that guide thinking, decisions, and actions…” (2006).

We all know that correctional settings have their own vocabulary, rules, practices and expectations that prisoners, correctional officers, nurses, and visitors must comply with to survive in the environment. These values, beliefs, norms and ways of being arise from philosophies about punishment in our society. The culture of incarceration and our beliefs about punishment in civil society affect how individual nurses provide “care” in the correctional setting.

Today I came across a tremendous article by Sally Gadow, Professor Emerita at University of Colorado College of Nursing that describes how different philosophies about punishment are manifest in the practice of correctional nurses (2003). Ascribing to a belief about the role of punishment and incarceration in society is necessary for nurses to address the ethical conflict between care and punishment.

It has made me consider how my nursing practice is affected by my beliefs about the role of incarceration and punishment. Here is a summary of the article.

Punishment as an immediate or reflexive consequence of wrong doing: The violation of community values, morays or laws results in an automatic or reflexive consequence for a wrongful act. In this system of beliefs the punishment occurs automatically and enforcement of the law or rule is unquestioned; there is no consideration of the circumstances or characteristics of the situation. Punishment for violation of norms in this system of beliefs require practices that exile the offender, deny freedom and loss of respect for the individual.

Nursing practices that are congruent with this philosophy about punishment include those that assert the authority of the law, morale principle or norm. In other words, nursing care that extends the interest of punishment. An extreme example would be participation in an execution. Other examples are writing infractions, participating in disciplinary hearings, collecting forensic evidence and approving use of force. When nurses comply with the expectations of the correctional system uncritically, they are at risk of providing care that advances the system perhaps at the expense of the individual. The American Nurses Association provides guidance in professional practice standard 11 on Communication stating that correctional nurses must be competent in questioning the rationale of processes and decisions when they do not appear to be in the best interest of the patient (2013).

Punishment as a logical consequence of wrong doing: An emotionally detached and reasoned approach to punishment and it’s meaning in relation to wrongdoing. Punishment still serves to exile the offender, deny freedom and express loss of respect for individuals who violate society norms and laws. Included in this category are the philosophies of “just desserts” which may also be known biblically as “an eye for an eye”. This is a belief that the degree of punishment should be equal to the severity of the violation. An example of this is the death penalty sentence for murder. Another belief is that of “fair play” when the benefits for a group (society) are achieved only when all comply with the rules. When someone fails to respect the rules a debt to society is owed and punishment is necessary to repay the debt. When we say that incarceration is the punishment, not the further denial of health care or programming during incarceration, this is an example of “fair play.” The last belief in this subset is that of “deterrence” which is to establish punishment severe enough to prevent harm or to protect the community. The punishment chosen is not constrained by the concept of fairness or reciprocity. An example of this would be three strikes laws which serve to deter recidivism and to remove repeat offenders from the community.

Correctional nursing practices consistent with this set of beliefs suppress emotion, embodiment and relationships with patients. The practice of nursing is with objective detachment. By being disengaged the nurse avoids being influenced in a negative or positive way by their personal knowledge of the offender. Many nurses adopt this approach to nursing practice believing that the best way to avoid being “conned” or manipulated by a patient is to rely solely on the nurse’s objective data discounting the patient’s report. With-holding analgesia because of a patient’s history of drug abuse is an example. Delays in responding to requests for health care attention because the problem is not significantly urgent would be another example. However there are numerous competencies listed in the ANA Scope and Standards of Practice (2013) that call for nurses to do more than adopt this disengaged approach to correctional nursing practice. The ANA standards for delivery of care in the correctional setting require nurses to elicit the patient’s personal experience and preferences with regard to illness, discomfort or disability and to partner with them to evaluate their care (Standards 1, 5-7) in a manner that preserves and protects the patient’s autonomy, dignity, rights, beliefs, and values.

Engagement as a paradox of punishment: Punishment is not an essential feature of justice but instead the focus is to restore trust and engagement between the offender and society. Detention may be necessary to engage the violator in the actions that are necessary to restore trust. The offender is not objectified and exiled but is made to relate in meaningful ways with the community. Examples of these beliefs in action include strengths based programming, drug and alcohol rehabilitation, probation and community corrections, half way houses and work camps. The meaning of the experience for offenders is the product of their engagement with others rather than an absolute defined by society.

A correctional nurse under this set of beliefs accepts the contradiction between care and punishment and does not need to embrace a particular viewpoint to resolve the conflict. The nurse assumes responsibility for defining their practice in the interest of the patient and does not accept someone else’s interpretation of how their practice should conform to some moral or ethical norm. Nursing actions are designed to assist prisoners to recover their ability to participate in the community and use their relationship with the patient as the crucible for this work. Engagement is characterized as accepting the possible validity of the patient’s perspective and the potential that the nurse’s opinion can be altered by the patient’s perspective. The nurse’s opinions or beliefs can be held firmly (not to be manipulated) but they are not absolute and open to the possibility of revision based upon experience with the patient or their situation. Dignity and respect for the patient is recognized as necessary to the caring relationship. An example is when nurses individualize a patient’s plan of care rather than apply the same intervention for all patients with the same condition. Patients are regarded as individuals rather than inmates. The ANA’s Standard 13 on Collaboration is explicit in that nurses promote engagement and participate in building consensus in the context of care for the patient (2013).

Conclusions: Correctional nurses often talk about the conflict between care and custody. Custody is a manifestation of beliefs about punishment. Nurses in correctional settings are influenced by the correctional culture, affecting their relationship with patients and ultimately their practice. I was surprised at the extent to which beliefs from all three of these descriptions have affected my practice environment. It is a relief to know that it is enough to recognize the care and custody conflict in order to find my way practically in this field. It is not necessary or even recommended that the conflict be resolved in order to provide ethical nursing care.

I suggest that correctional nurses reflect on the ways in which beliefs about punishment are manifest in their nursing practice. Reflection may suggest areas of practice that warrant more review and development. There may be aspects of practice that are unintentionally harmful or conflict with an ethical premise related to the nursing imperative of care. This material has been provided in the interest of stimulating dialogue among correctional nurses not to suggest a particular standard of practice.

For more on the ethical issues in providing nursing care in the correctional setting see Chapter 2 in our book, Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order your copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

 

Photo credit: © Andrey Popov – Fotolia.com

 

 

References

American Nurses Association (2013) Correctional Nursing: Scope & Standards of Practice. Silver Springs, MD: Nursesbooks.org.

Gadow, S. (2003) Restorative nursing: toward a philosophy of postmodern justice. Nursing Philosophy. 4: 161-167.

Leininger, M. M. & McFarland, M. R. (2006) Culture care diversity and universality: A world wide nursing theory. Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Six Challenges Managing Medications that make Correctional Nursing Unique

3d illustration of a corridor

 Medication management is a primary responsibility of nurses working in correctional settings (American Nurses Association (ANA) 2013). The Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that 66% of prisoners and 40% of inmates in jail who had a chronic condition were taking prescription medication. Among inmates with mental illness 27% of those in state prisons, 19% in Federal prisons and 15% in jails reported receiving prescription medication while incarcerated (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2006). In addition to chronic medical problems and psychiatric disorders, medications are prescribed for inmates who have acute conditions, such as urinary tract infection as well as to provide symptom relief for minor illnesses and discomfort such as headache, constipation or seasonal allergies. As much as 80% of the population at a correctional facility may be taking medication for one or more of these reasons.

Medication management is identified as one of the features of correctional nursing that distinguishes it as a specialized field. Nurses who are new to the correctional setting are often unprepared for the scope and breadth of their role and responsibilities for managing medication delivery and yet they must meet the same standards for delivery of medication as in the community (ANA 2013).These challenges define what is unique about correctional nursing practice with regard to medications.

I started making a list of the challenges correctional nurses deal with in managing medication delivery. When the list became almost a full page long I sat back and thought about what similarities there were between the items and the following groupings came together.

  1. Professional isolation: Health care delivery in correctional facilities is often a very small part of the overall operation. In many cases nurses are expected to deliver services in independently and without advice from other health care providers. Nurses recently commented on CorrectionalNurse.net, Lorry’s other website that double checking dosages of high risk medications is a challenge when there is only one health care person on duty. One solution is to have the inmate confirm that the dose corresponded with what he or she understands it should be. Dispensing, drug packaging, storage inventory and disposal of medications are all subjects governed by state pharmacy laws and regulations. Unless there is a pharmacist on staff, correctional nurses need to be familiar with and ensure their practices comply with these requirements, in addition to the nursing regulations, when managing medication in the correctional setting.
  2. Security: Maintaining security is a primary focus of correctional facilities. This includes accounting for the presence and activities of each inmate throughout the day, ensuring that only authorized persons and products enter and exit the facility, and that contraband does not enter, is not otherwise obtained or manufactured. The most obvious example of a unique responsibility for correctional nurses is counting needles and syringes and accounting for each use. Others are ensuring access to inmates when medication is due (even on lockdown) and protecting patient confidentiality (not having medication lines that serve to identify the mentally ill or those with HIV disease for ridicule or extortion by others). Sometimes a facility will determine that for security reasons, not clinical, that all medication must be floated on water or even worse, crushed, impacting patient adherence, the time it takes to administer medication and in some cases the therapeutic effectiveness of the drug. Nurses need to confer with security on an ongoing basis so that security practices that compromise the therapeutic value of prescribed treatment are not put in place.
  3. Safety: The safety of inmates, staff and the general community is the other primary focus of correctional facilities. For correctional nurses this includes ensuring the safety of themselves and patients as well. A significant aspect of medication delivery is managing inmate behavior. This includes consistent practices for patient identification (two-part identification), checking that inmates don’t cheek or palm medication, providing privacy at the medication window or cart (prevent crowding). Often an officer will be assigned to escort the nurse or mange the medication line. Nurses need to engage the cooperation and assistance of this officer and be alert to their own behavior so that medication administration is conducted in a safe and efficient manner. The patient safety aspects are ensuring the cleanliness and hygiene of the medication delivery area to prevent transmission of infectious disease and monitoring conditions so that side effects from medications that make patients heat or light sensitive are prevented.
  4. Expanded role: Unless a correctional facility is large and has a number of specialized programs the health care program is likely to be staffed pretty simply without the support services nurses are used to in other health care settings such as pharmacy technicians, IV teams, respiratory therapists, inventory clerks and so forth. Nurses in correctional facilities routinely perform these roles instead and if there is assistance the nurse is responsible for their assignments and supervision. Nurses order medication from the pharmacy, arrange for refills and renewals, check for outdated drugs, receive, inventory and store medications and arrange for medication to be returned or properly destroyed. Nurse initiate treatment for patients via nursing standardized protocols that involve providing the patient with medication to treat the illness or manage symptoms. Nurses are the primary health care professional responsible to ensure that patients do receive medication as ordered and are expected to monitor patient adherence and solve problems with medication availability. Correctional nurses also assess the patient’s ability to manage their own medication if the facility has a self-medication or “Keep on Person” (KOP) program and to provide education or other assistance to support the inmates in providing their own care.
  5. Greater volume and scope: Because correctional nurses are responsible for the health needs of the entire population housed at one or more facilities they are generalists in nursing practice not specialists. Medications may be administered by a nurse or other personnel supervised by the nurse so that the inmate is directly observed when taking medication. Inmates may also be provided with a supply of medication by a nurse to take by themselves in a KOP or self- carry program. Nurses may also take medication to administer to patients in restraints, seclusion or housed in a high security setting for disciplinary or protective reasons. Nurses may give some medication under rules that allow for involuntary administration to patients with mental illness. In some correctional facilities nurses may be expected to use PICC lines or other specialized equipment or procedures to administer medication. The volume of medication administered by a nurse in the correctional setting exceeds that in any other setting. One difference is that most patients on pill line would be responsible for taking these medications by themselves or with the assistance of family in their own home.
  6. Timeliness: Medication delivery and administration must take place in coordination with all of the other activities that compete for the time and availability of inmates. In one facility I recently visited medication administration was halted on a unit until the canteen delivery was finished. The nurse was stranded in the corridor for twenty minutes until canteen was over. When the nurse insisted that medications be administered and canteen delivery wait the inmates complained bitterly. This is just one example of the competition for time. These time pressures can affect the therapeutic effectiveness of the drug if given too close or far apart. If inmates go to work or court before nursing staff are on duty inmates may miss important doses. The volume of medication to be given can impact timeliness; if there are too many medications a nurse may feel pressure to short cut or abandon the five rights resulting in increased patient risk.

So what are your thoughts about the uniqueness of medication management in correctional nursing practice? What have I forgotten or you would describe differently? Is there anything discussed here that you disagree with because it is not unique to correctional nursing. Share your thoughts in the comments section of this post.

Are you interested in knowing more about this nursing specialty? If so, see our book, Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order your copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

 

Photo credit: © Yannis Ntousiopoulos – Fotolia.com

References:

American Nurses Association (2013) Correctional Nursing: Scope and standards of professional practice. American Nurses Association. Silver Springs, MD.

James, D.J. & Glaze, L.E. (2006) Mental Health Problems of Prison and Jail Inmates. U.S. Department of Justice, Officer of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. Accessed 6.16.2015 at http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/mhppji.pdf

Maruschak, L. M., Berzofsky, M., & Unangst J (2015) Medical Problems of State and Federal Prisoners and Jail Inmates, 2011-12. U.S. Department of Justice, Officer of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics. Accessed 6.16.2015 at http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/mpsfpji1112.pdf

Empathy: A Practice not an Emotion

Young man on reception at psychologistEmpathy has been discussed as a basic component of effective nursing practice since the 1960s. It is important because empathy produces insight into an patient’s experience and coping with illness. These insights facilitate the nurse’s diagnostic accuracy, problem solving and care becomes more patient centered. When patients feel understood they become engaged in a helping relationship with the health care professional and are more likely to adhere to treatment recommendations and advice about healthy lifestyle changes (Wiseman 2007).

Concerns about expression of empathy in correctional settings

Correctional nurses sometimes express concern about being empathetic with inmates. A simple definition of empathy is that it involves the ability to see the world through another person’s eyes. In correctional practice this definition is sometimes misinterpreted to mean that you have to think, feel and act like a criminal or a murderer or a sex offender; an impossible and unethical expectation. Another misunderstanding about empathy in correctional nursing is that the nurse is letting their emotions or feelings guide their actions and they are at risk of being manipulated by the inmate. Empathy in nursing practice is not a subjective emotion or feeling but is instead a professional interaction (Dinkins 2011, Mercer & Reynolds 2002).

If empathy isn’t an emotion, what is it?

A more descriptive definition of empathy is that it is the ability to perceive and understand the meanings, feelings and concerns of another person and to communicate that understanding to the other person. Empathy involves perceiving, thinking and communicating about another person’s experience and concerns. You do not have to think or feel like the other person to practice nursing empathically. There are three parts to empathy in nursing practice, sometimes referred to as the Empathy Cycle, these are:

  1. Listening, reasoning and understanding. Essential skills are the ability to listen attentively and the sensitivity to perceive another person’s experience, concerns or perspective on a subject. Understanding is a cognitive process that involves reflection and the suspension of judgment.
  2. Conveying understanding of the other person and your intention to help. Communication must be patient centered, accurate; not judgmental or blaming.
  3. The patient’s awareness that the nurse has communicated understanding and believes it to be genuine and accurate (Mercer & Reynolds 2002, Wiseman 1996, Wiseman 2007).

An example of empathy in correctional nursing practice

Last week I observed a nurse in sick call. She was seeing a 19 year old man for complaints of headache and acne. During her assessment she checked his medication administration record and noted that he had missed several days of thyroid medication. At first she lectured him about the importance of taking it each day. He looked at his feet and mumbled his understanding and agreement. Next she asked why he wasn’t taking it and he replied that he was still bed when it was time for morning meds. They talked some more about why he couldn’t get up and the impact of not taking the medication. Finally she said “Staying in bed in the morning is more important to you right now, isn’t it?” He nodded yes. Her reply was “I understand; let me see if the doctor will change the medication time to noon or the evening. Would that work better for you?” He nodded and indicated verbally that it would help.

The nurse accurately understood that for this young man, the consequences of not taking the prescribed medication were so remote compared to his desire to stay in bed that he would forgo the medication even after having listened to the information she provided. She acknowledged his reality that staying in bed was more important to him and used the information to problem solve a way to increase his medication adherence.

At this same correctional facility where I observed the nurse conducting sick call, the correctional officers are taught in training academy to offer empathy in their interactions with inmates. The curriculum notes that empathy establishes a dynamic that allows the officer to assist the inmate in problem solving, to feel understood and supported. Empathy is described as the “crown jewel” of active listening technique. The fact that correctional officers are taught in training academy how to use empathy really seems to support correctional nurses’ use of empathy in their interactions with patients.

Empathy and the Standards of Professional Practice in Correctional Nursing

Several of the professional practice standards for correctional nurses published by the American Nurses Association describe empathy among the competencies that nurses must demonstrate to meet the standard. The nurse in the example given above demonstrated all of the competencies in her brief interaction with the patient during sick call. These include:

Standard 1 Assessment: The correctional nurse elicits the patient’s values, preferences, expressed needs, and knowledge of the healthcare situation to utilize such information as appropriate within the context of the correctional setting.

Standard 4 Planning: The correctional nurse develops an individualized plan in partnership with the patient considering the patient’s characteristics or situation, including but not limited to values, beliefs, spiritual and health practice preferences, choices, developmental level, coping style, culture and environment, safety of the patient, and available technology.

Standard 5 Implementation: The correctional nurse advocates for health care that is sensitive to the needs of the patient, with particular emphasis on the needs of diverse populations.

Standard 7 Ethics: The correctional nurse maintains a therapeutic and professional nurse-patient relationship within appropriate professional boundaries.

Standard 13 Collaboration: The correctional nurse promotes conflict management and patient engagement (2014).

Reasons for lack of empathy in nursing practice

The primary factor that has been identified as impacting the practice of empathy among health care professionals is a fixation on the tasks and technology of care coupled with time compression. Other reasons identified as impeding empathic practice include:

Difficult patients Anxiety about patients Feeling belittled or insignificant
Unsympathetic colleagues Lack of role models Fear of making a mistake
Individual nurse’s personality Intimidating environment Pressure on task completion

(Ward, Cody, Schaal, & Hojat 2012)

Every one of these factors could be present in the practice environment of a correctional nurse. How many of them factor into your practice environment and to what extent have they impacted your use of empathy in the delivery of patient care? Empathy is not solely a personality trait; it is a skill that can be taught and developed (Wiseman 2007). Taking a moment to reflect on our practice environment may identify opportunities to improve our empathic response in patient interactions. From there it is possible to create a plan of professional development in this area.

Empathy reminders for our practice

Helen Riess, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School gave her TEDx Talk audience (2013) the following mnemonic which she uses to help health care providers develop empathic responses in their patient care encounters.

E              Eye contact – this is first indication that we have acknowledged an individual and it begins the interaction

M            Muscles of facial expression – are the road map of human emotion, notice the patient’s facial expression

P             Posture – an open or closed posture indicates receptivity (or lack thereof) to interaction (both yours and the patients). Maintaining an open posture facilitates the patient’s interaction with the health care provider.

A             Affect – is a term for expressed emotion; try to identify label the patient’s emotion, and listen to the patient with that perspective, it will improve your understanding of what the patient is communicating

T              Tone of voice – is an indicator of emotion, vocal chords are located in the brain close to the same area that activates fight or flight response, changes in tone of voice may be an early indicator of emotion

H             Hearing the whole person – more than the words that are said, understand the context of the patient’s experience, and be non-judgmental in order to comprehend

Y             Your response – pay attention to your feelings; we respond to others all the time; know what you are conveying and manage your part of the relationship professionally.

Are the challenges of using empathy in your professional correctional nursing practice similar to those described here? If so what resources have you found helpful in addressing these challenges? Please reply by responding in the comments section of this post.

For more on the nurses professional practice relationship with patients in the correctional setting see Chapter 2 Ethical Principles for Correctional Nursing as well as Chapter 19 Professional Practice in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. You can order a copy from Springer Publishing and get $15 off as well as free shipping by using this code – AF1209.

References

American Nurses Association. (2013). Correctional nursing scope and standards of practice. Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.

Dinkins, C. (2011) Ethics: Beyond patient care: Practicing empathy in the workplace. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing 16(2).

Mercer, S. W. & Reynolds, W.J. (2002) Empathy and quality of care. British Journal of General Practice Quality Supplement 52: S9-S13.

Riess, H. (2013) The power of empathy. TEDxMiddlebury. Accessed 4/25/2015 at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=baHrcC8B4WM

Ward, J., Cody, J., Schaal, M., & Hojat, M. (2012) The empathy enigma: An empirical study of decline in empathy among undergraduate nursing students. Journal of Professional Nursing 28 (1) 34-40.

Wiseman, T. (1996) A concept analysis of empathy. Journal of Advanced Nursing 23: 1162-1167.

Wiseman, T. (2007) Toward a holistic conceptualization of empathy for nursing practice. Advances in Nursing Science 2(3): E61-E72.

Photo credit: © Africa Studio– Fotolia.com