What are these eight rights anyway?

The picture posted with this column of a nurse on her way to give medications gives rise to many thoughtsNurse Medication Picture and memories. For me, it brings memories of my early years in nursing practice.  We wore white uniforms, white shoes, white nylons and white caps.  . I remember learning how to safely and accurately administer medications through each of the steps from the physician’s order to setting up medications, to administration and documentation. I also remember how much emphasis was placed on giving the right patient the right medications. Like the nurse in the picture, medication rounds were done using a tray holding medication in cups and small cards with the patient information and medication on them.

Years later, the safety of administering medications was outlined in the Five Rights of Medication Administration.  I cannot tell from the literature when these became formalized but when I returned to school in the mid 1980’s, the Five Rights were prominent in nursing practice, risk management and patient safety.

Health Care Advances

As the body of knowledge for nursing practice evolves, we continuously improve our practice to assure our patients receive the highest level of care with an emphasis on patient safety and error reduction. Because of this, three more rights have been added to the body of knowledge for medication administration, making a total of eight rights.

In corrections settings, medication administration is completed by a variety of job classifications. No matter who gives medications to patients, they must be qualified and trained in medication administration and follow the Eight Rights, as described below:

  1. Right Patient: check the name on the medication administration record (MAR), use two identifiers; ask patient to identify themselves, check name &/or picture on ID wrist band or badge.
  2. Right Medication: check the order, select medication, compare to the order, check the MAR, and then check the medication against the MAR before giving to the patient. If it is a new medication does the patient know what it is for and are there any allergies that would contradict giving it.
  3. Right Dose: check the order or the MAR, confirm the appropriateness of the dose, for medications with high risk consequences from dosing errors have someone double check the calculation.
  4. Right Route: check the order and MAR, confirm the route is the correct for that medication and dose, confirm that the patient can receive it by the ordered route.
  5. Right Time: check frequency the medication is to be given on the MAR and the time is correct for this dose, confirm when the last dose was given.
  6. Right Documentation: document administration AFTER giving the medication, document the route, time and other specifics such as site, if injectable, lab value, pain scale or other data as appropriate.
  7. Right Reason: confirm the rationale for the ordered medication; why is it prescribed, does the patient know why they are taking this medication. If they have been taking it for long is its continued use justified?
  8. Right Response: has the drug had its desired effect, does the patient verbalize improvement in symptoms, and does the patient think there is a need for an adjustment in the medication?  Document your monitoring of the patient for intended and unintended effects.

Adapted from Bonsall, L. M. (2011). 8 rights of medication administration. Retrieved June 17, 2016 from http://www.nursingcenter.com/ncblog/may-2011/8-rights-of-medication-administration

The Important Three

When you examine the new three rights closely, their importance becomes clear and explains why they are included as best practices:

  • Right Documentation:  We hear from our legal representatives, instructors, managers and peers, that “if it was not documented, it was not done”. No excuses can make up for a patient receiving double dose of medications when it was not documented or a provider changing a medication when they thought a patient was not taking the medication. Besides accurate and timely documentation of medications administered, this right also includes the accurate documentation of the order on the MAR.
  • Right Reason: When taking off orders or preparing to administer a medication, knowing why the patient is taking a medication is the foundation for patient education and evaluating the effects of the treatment. This is especially important when a particular medication, such as gabapentin, may be ordered to address one of several different conditions (seizure, nerve pain, restless leg syndrome etc.). Information in the patient’s chart will often clarify why this medication is being ordered; if not, consult the provider so that you know what the patient can expect from the treatment.
  • Right Response: We cannot effectively teach a patient about a certain medication and the desired effects of treatment if we do not know the drug ourselves.  Knowing about medications is a continual learning process, which grows day by day.  Make a habit of learning about new drugs each day.  This information can be found in the drug reference books kept in the medication room, by talking with providers, consult with the pharmacist, discussing medications at shift or team reports and exchanging information with team members.  See also a previous post that describes all of the online drug references that are available without charge.

Spread the Word about the 8

Even though these additional best practices have been discussed in the literature and have been topics in nursing education for several years, I still hear nurses refer to the Five Rights. They are called rights because they are not a request or desire—but a RIGHT. Each one of the eight rights is fundamental to nursing practice and when used together better promote patient care and enhance safety. By following these steps, nurses promote wellness and identify and prevent harm to our patients. What do the eight rights of medication administration mean to you?  How has understanding the eight rights in your practice, improved your patients care?  Share your experiences and challenges with medication administration in the comment section below.

Read more about correctional nursing in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

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Medication Reconciliation

Fotolia_85555232_XSAn inmate approaches you at morning med line and asks for his medication. When he gives you his name and identification number you are unable to find a corresponding Medication Administration Record (MAR) and there is no medication with his name on it in the drawer. This is the psych step down unit so he is probably correct to expect to have medication. When asked he tells you that he arrived on the unit last evening from 3E, the acute psych unit. You tell him that there is no medication for him on the cart and that you will contact the pharmacy and will get back to him later that morning. You are thinking that his medication is still in the med cart on 3E and will call the nurse on the unit as soon as you get back to the clinic.

Does this example sound familiar? How many times are you approached to administer a medication and it is not there? It could be because the inmate was just admitted to the facility or just saw the provider and the medication hasn’t been received from the pharmacy. It could be that the inmate was transferred from one unit to another and his or her medication was not transferred to the new location. Maybe the inmate just returned from an off-site procedure and the provider hasn’t reviewed the specialist’s recommendations.

Each admission, provider visit, transfer or change in level of care is an opportunity for omission, duplication, dosing errors, drug-drug interactions and drug-disease interactions to occur and with it the potential for an adverse patient outcome. Almost half of all medication errors in the general health care community occur because medication is not reconciled adequately when there is a handoff in responsibility for the patient’s care and 20% of these result in harm to the patient. Transitions in the responsibility for an inmate’s health care have the same risk. Medication reconciliation prevents mistakes in patient care.

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Joint Commission recommend reconciling medication whenever there is a change in the patient’s setting, condition, provider or level of care required. In corrections medication reconciliation is done when inmates at admission report taking medication prescribed by providers in the community. These medications will need orders to continue or the inmate’s treatment modified by the provider at the correctional facility assuming responsibility for the patient’s care. Medication reconciliation also takes place when an inmate returns to the facility after receiving specialty care in the community, upon admission and discharge from infirmary or another type of inpatient care and whenever their primary care provider changes. There are only three simple steps involved in reconciliation. These are:

  1. Verify the name, dosage, time and route of the medication (s) taken or recommended.
  2. Clarify the appropriateness of the medication and dosing.
  3. Reconcile and document any changes between what is reported or recommended.

The following paragraphs discuss how medication reconciliation is done at several key points in correctional health care.

When Inmates Arrive at a Facility

Intake screening routinely includes an inquiry into what medications an inmate is taking. Sometimes this question is only briefly discussed. However, if an inmate reports recent hospitalization or receipt of health care in an ambulatory care setting it would be a good idea to inquire again about what medications may have been recommended or prescribed. The same is recommended if an inmate reports having a chronic condition. It may be that they are not currently taking medication because they can’t afford it or were unable to obtain the medication for another reason. Inquiry about medications should also include the inmate’s use of over-the-counter or other alternative treatments.

Offenders arriving at a facility from the community, especially jails and juvenile facilities, may have medications on their person and sometimes, family will bring in medications after learning their family member has been detained. It is best practice to verify that the medication received is the same as that on the label. There are several excellent sites for verification of drugs including Drugs.com, Pillbox, and Epocrates.com. Once verified, document the name of the medication, dose, and frequency, date of filling, quantity remaining, physician, pharmacy and prescription number.

Whether it is the inmate’s report or the inmate has brought in their own medication the prescription must next be verified with the pharmacy or community prescriber. Once this is done, notify the institution provider who will determine if the medication should be started urgently so there is no lapse in treatment or if the patient should wait until seen for evaluation.

When Inmates Return From Offsite care

Medication should also be reconciled whenever a patient returns to the facility from a hospitalization or specialty care. The clinical summary or recommendations by the offsite provider should accompany the patient, if not, the nurse should obtain this information right away. Recommendations from off-site specialists or hospital discharge instructions should be reviewed as soon as possible by the nurse and provider in order to continue the patient’s care. When clinical recommendations from off-site care are missed or not followed up on needed treatment is delayed and the patient’s health may deteriorate.

When Inmates Are Followed in Chronic Care Clinic

Chronic care patients are another group that require nursing attentiveness to medication reconciliation including:

  • Evaluating whether the patient is actually taking it as ordered.
  • Following up whenever the medication or the patient is not available and if so, getting scheduled doses to the patient promptly. Also helping the patient to request refills and reorders in time may be necessary so doses are not missed. Also account for the whereabouts of each no show so that medication can be provided as scheduled.
  • Coaching the patient about what to discuss with their provider if they want to make a change or are having side effects. Often patients who want to change or discontinue prescribed treatment will refuse single doses or not pick up their KOP medications. Each of these lapses should be discussed, the patient coached about the next steps to take and the provider notified as well.

When Medications Are Missing

When patients come to the pill cart or widow expecting to receive medication and there is either no medication or MAR asking the patient a few questions as listed below will narrow down where the medication may be located:

  • when was the last dose received (this indicates there is an active prescription and will help determine the urgency for resolution)?
  • If the inmate says that he or she haven’t had any medication yet, ask when they saw the provider who ordered it? (maybe the prescription has not been dispensed yet or it has arrived but hasn’t been unpacked and put away).

Other questions to help narrow down the problem are:

  • if they have been moved recently from another part of the facility (medication and MAR were not transferred).
  • when did they arrive at the facility or were transferred from another (check the transfer sheet, medications and MAR were not transferred).
  • is it a prescription brought in from the community (may be stored elsewhere)?
  • if they have gone by any other names (may be filed elsewhere).

Based upon the answers to these question you may instruct the patient to wait (i.e. “It was just written last night and hasn’t been filled yet, please check back tomorrow.”) or tell the patient that you will look for it and administer it at by at least the next pill call. If you are not able to resolve the problem promptly be sure to assess the patient to determine if the provider should be contacted. Allowing patients to miss medication, even if somebody else is responsible, is equivalent to not providing treatment that is ordered and can be a serious violation of a patient’s constitutional rights in the correctional setting, much less exacerbate their medical condition.

Easing the Burden of Medication Reconciliation

Other recommendations to ease the burden of medication reconciliation from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement are:

  1. Identify responsibilities for medication reconciliation such as standardizing where information about current medications is located, specifying who is responsible for gathering information about medications and when medication reconciliation is to take place, establishing a time frame for resolution of variances and standardizing documentation of medication variance and resolution.
  2. Use standardized forms to ensure that information about medications is elicited and documented.
  3. Establish explicit time frames for when medication is to be reconciled and variances resolved such as within 24 hours of admission, within four hours of identification of variance in high risk medications (antihypertensives, anti seizure, antibiotics, etc.), at every primary care visit.
  4. Educate patients about their medications and their role in reconciliation at every transition in care.

When do you obtain information about the medications a patient takes and how do you verify the patient’s information? Do you provide patients with a list of the medications they take? What is the patient’s role in medication reconciliation at your facility?

If you wish to comment, offer advice about medication reconciliation in correctional health care please do so by responding in the comments section of this post.

Read more about correctional nursing in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

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Protective Gear for Correctional Nurses

The post last week talked about the problem of nurses being exposed to inappropriate and hostile sexual behaviors by inmates and the kinds of interventions that should be in place to minimize or control antisocial inmate behavior. Nurses were advised not to confront this behavior single handedly but to look to the facility for guidance. But that is just half the solution, the other half, which is the subject of today’s post, is that individuals can take steps on their own to minimize the adverse effects of these unfortunate situations on themselves.

The reality is that bad things do happen in corrections. Even in the best run correctional facilities inmates are injured and sometimes staff are injured as a result of violence and on some of these occasions died as a result of the violence. The nature of the correctional environment is that it always has the potential for immediate violence and direct trauma. Another pervasive aspect of our working environment is that because of the involuntary conditions of incarceration, there is inherent conflict, particularly between staff and inmates. These two features of the work environment combined with operational stressors, such as high workload, contribute to what has been called “Corrections Fatigue”.

It has been suggested that correctional staff prepare themselves to be in this environment the same way that they don other protective gear. An analogy for correctional nurses would be gowning, gloving and putting on a properly fitted mask before going into the isolation room of a patient with active tuberculosis. By wearing protective gear staff minimize their exposure. The same concept applies to the trauma associated with repeated exposure to violence or threatening behavior. What kind of “gear” minimizes our repeated exposure to trauma in the corrections environment?

Resilience is a characteristic that refers to an individual’s ability to cope with adversity; it is the ability to “bounce back” after a stressful experience. Resilience varies from one person to another but we can each tend to and build our resilience. Resilience, then is our protective gear. The following four behaviors have been identified as building resilience in correctional workers.

Build Supportive Relationships at Work – Building and maintaining social support among co-workers has been found to correlate with resilience for the person offering support. By building genuine bonds with co-workers we increase our sense of safety, reduce interpersonal tension and staff conflict. Examples of behaviors that are supportive of relationships at work include:

  • being friendly and respectful,
  • asking how a co-worker is and paying attention to their answer,
  • acknowledging a job well done,
  • looking for ways to assist others when you have time,
  • thanking others for their assistance, and
  • being compassionate with others’ experiences.

Take Care of Yourself – How many times have we as health care providers offered this advice to others? And yet we are known to neglect ourselves, making us vulnerable to burnout, compassion fatigue and now, corrections fatigue. Being healthy is a basic tenet of resilience. Healthy habits and lifestyle behaviors include those that attend not just to your physical needs, but psychological, spiritual and social needs as well. Healthy habits and lifestyle behaviors include:

  • maintaining balance between work and home life
  • mindfully transition to and from work
  • prioritize free time to be with people who are significant in your family and social life
  • engaging in pleasant activity-having fun
  • regulate negative emotions (emotional intelligence)
  • establish a regular and healthy sleep schedule.

Be Confident and Perseverant – These behaviors build competence handling complex or challenging circumstances at work. Confidence and perseverance are a result of:

  • a resolution to complete tasks even when it is difficult,
  • using self-talk to motivate oneself to persevere in the face of adversity,
  • rehearsing and repeating training so that it becomes more automatic and built in,
  • being flexible, open and adaptive to change
  • being ethical and acting with integrity.

Use Logic to Solve Problems – This approach is recommended as a way to keep your cool in the face of the complex or challenging problems we deal with in correctional health care. Thinking logically about situations means considering more than one possible cause and weighing possible responses before choosing the one that is most likely to have the effect you are seeking. This way you maintain control and composure in frustrating or disappointing circumstances. Practical ways to practice logical problem solving and self-control include:

  • divide complex problems into parts and tackle one component at a time,
  • learn how to detach emotionally from challenging situations,
  • view mistakes as learning opportunities,
  • regulate fear and other negative emotions while acting constructively,
  • accept that you cannot always be in control.

These four behaviors, supporting workplace relationships, taking care of yourself, being confident and perseverant, and logical problem solving are your protective gear (resilience) to reduce the effects of violence and other antisocial behaviors, conflict and other operational stressors that are inherent in the correctional setting on your health and well-being.

For more information about promoting wellness among staff who work in correctional settings please see the National Institute of Corrections has collected articles and other resources on this subject. They also sponsored a podcast on the subject in 2014 which can be accessed on the NIC website. Much of this information was adapted for correctional nursing from a series of articles written by Caterina Spinaris PhD., Executive Director of Desert Waters Correctional Outreach which provides training and other materials to support wellness of correctional staff including a monthly newsletter, Correctional Oasis.

I was most surprised to learn from my research for this blog post that when I offered support to co-workers it had a positive effect on me by building resilience. This new idea has me thinking about my work relationships and how I support others to see what I could do better. What resilience building behaviors have caused you to reflect on your own behaviors? Is there more you could do to protect yourself from the negative attributes of your working environment?

If you wish to comment, offer advice or share an experience concerning the subject of staff wellness please do so by responding in the comments section of this post.

Read more about correctional nursing in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

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Sexual Harassment by Inmates Against Nurses

A nursing colleague recently asked for advice about how to address the problem of inmates masturbating and making verbal threats during nursing encounters. It is a problem nearly all correctional nurses will face at some point in their career. This post is written to ask nurses how they have dealt with inmates who expose themselves or masturbate in front of the nurse while administering medication, evaluating a health care complaint or responding to a man down call.

While nurses put up with some anti-social behavior in almost any setting, nurses really can be challenged with the pervasiveness of this in a correctional setting. Some nurses will confront the behavior, others will ignore it, and some dish it right back all in an effort of controlling the offensive behavior and getting nursing care delivered. However unchecked exhibitionism is a form of violence towards others that is not acceptable even in a correctional facility. In 2006, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with the lower court’s ruling under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act finding for the employee and noted that prison officials in the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation may “not ignore sexually hostile conduct and must take corrective action to safeguard the rights of victims, whether they be guards or inmates”. Similar litigation has been successful in Florida.

Nurses should not attempt to confront the problem alone and have good cause to look to their immediate employer as well as prison officials to address the problem of sexually hostile conduct. Another colleague, who is a corrections expert, recommends addressing the problem in an integrated way that includes making expectations for behavior explicit, delineating graduated consequences that include criminal charges and involvement of the local prosecutor. Here is a list of items which if in place at a correctional facility provide the means to address sexual misconduct:

  • There is an inmate handbook including written rules of conduct for inmates that specifically addresses the issue of exhibitionist masturbation and other forms of sexual misconduct.
  • The handbook also delineates the inmate disciplinary process- what specific offenses bring what penalties – including a description of the inmate disciplinary process.
  • The handbook is available in the languages of those who are incarcerated and written at a 5th grade level for those with low literacy skills.
  • Inmates are provided an orientation at intake – that is documented (video or in person) and goes over the rules, including the rules regarding exposure, masturbation and other forms of sexual misconduct.
  • This information is repeated by the housing unit officer, posted on the housing unit or televised in the living areas.
  • There are facility policies and procedures for staff that describe:
    • inmate housing unit management
    • inmate rules of conduct (including exhibitionism, masturbation in public and other forms of sexual misconduct)
    • how rules of conduct will be enforced and
    • the inmate disciplinary process.

          Also there is evidence that staff training about the facility policies and procedures has taken place     and repeated as necessary.

  • There are provisions for management of inmates with mental illness, or suspected of mental illness, related to in-custody behaviors and related discipline, and treatment.
  • There is documentation that inmates who engage in prohibited behavior receive disciplinary notices, participate in a disciplinary process, and if found guilty serve disciplinary sanctions. These sanctions may include but are not limited to disciplinary segregation.
  • For offenses such as exhibitionist masturbation one effective strategy to develop behavior contracts. For example, if the inmate serves X days of disciplinary sanctions without incident they get X days off their sentence.
  • There is a record of disciplinary notices, hearings, sanctions, etc. for these specific offenses.
  • There is a process by which staff notify their supervisors and/or the leadership regarding offensive inmate behavior.
  • The facility has programming and other services that can be withheld from inmates who violate policies/procedures and found guilty of disciplinary infractions.
  • Inmates who engage in this behavior repeatedly are charged via law enforcement and referred for prosecution. At one facility a prosecutor actually speaks to the inmates about how if they engage in this behavior and are administratively and/or criminally charged – how it effects their sentencing at trial, parole consideration, and conditions of release. Most inmates don’t think about the longer term consequences on their own so it helps to point it out.
  • Finally the agency should be aggressive in referring for prosecution – if the prosecutor declines- then the facility should focus on ways to convince the prosecutor to change their position.

Are these measures in place at the correctional facility you work at? You might want to review the inmate handbook at your facility and see if there are explicit guidelines about sexually hostile behavior and the consequences. Have you had experience addressing the problem of inmate masturbation during delivery of health care? If so, what was successful? Please share your experience by responding in the comments section of this post.

Read more about correctional nursing in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

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Intake Health Screening: Truth or Consequences?

Skinny Fighting LiarLast week I reviewed a letter responding to a complaint from an inmate’s wife that her husband was not receiving proper care for a back injury received when he was apprehended. The response starts like this “During intake screening on February 10, 2016 the inmate denied recent injury or hospitalizations. He also denied any past history of injury. Upon examination there were no signs or symptoms of injury to his back.”

How many times had you had something similar happen- an inmate seems to be healthy and denies any medical or mental health issues at intake, then a few hours, days or weeks later complains about a particular health issue alleging that it either happened just before incarceration or has been long standing? I have seen this happen lots of times. The letter above reminded me once again how inaccurate and unreliable health information obtained at intake can be. Some nurses I work with actually took a retrospective look at the accuracy of health information collected at intake compared to information obtained by asking the same questions a week later.  What were the findings? Well, it was surprising how much more information the inmate was able to provide.

What do you think are some of the reasons that information taken during intake screening differs from that obtained later? These are some of the reasons that nurses give when asked this question:

  1. Inmates are unreliable or untruthful. If you think about your experience with patients in emergency nursing, urgent care and to some extent ambulatory care settings you would probably agree that they didn’t always tell the whole truth either. Inmates really aren’t different in this regard. It is unrealistic to expect patients to tell you the whole truth when you are asking screening questions.
  2. Inmates are affected by drugs or alcohol and not aware of other health problems they may have, like infected teeth or other sources of pain. Jail nurses cite this as a reason more often. This is because the detainee arrives at the facility directly from the community. It’s always wise for the nurse to be mindful that they have not witnessed the inmate or their environment in the minutes, hours or days prior to intake screening and the inmate may not be able tell us that the headache they have, for example, is a subdural hematoma from a fight that happened on the transport bus an hour ago.
  3. Inmates are manipulative and distort the truth for secondary gain. Yes, they do. If I imagine myself in the same situation, I would too. If what I tell the nurse about my health gets me a preferable setting, with more access to visitation or a lower custody housing assignment, or protection from other inmates then I would answer intake screening questions in a way that is likely to result in my desired outcome. It doesn’t matter if the nurse has that kind of decision making power or not; if the inmate believes the nurse can influence these things they will answer accordingly.

Realizing that an inmate may not have answered the health screening questions fully will protect you from coming to clinical judgements and decisions that are based upon incomplete or inaccurate information. Other reasons for inaccurate intake screening information include:

  • An environment that is not conducive to sharing personal health information. This could be because other inmates can overhear the interview or that correctional officers are nearby. At one jail I visited, intake screening took place with a nurse sitting at a computer behind an elevated counter. The inmate was standing below, speaking to the nurse through a Plexiglas screen. Other inmates were standing about five feet away and officers were everywhere. This was equivalent to giving your health history by megaphone at a football game. No thanks!
  • Failure to communicate effectively. This could be because of cultural or language differences or disability. Health information is a complicated subject. If English is not the inmate’s primary language, the accuracy of screening information collected using English is not going to be as accurate as that collected in the inmate’s native language. The same is true of those who are deaf or hard of hearing. Considering cultural practices regarding health care will also yield richer information than when these are disregarded. Lastly, an uninterested and hardened nurse is not going to elicit personal health information very well from a patient in any setting, not just inmates in the correctional setting.
  • Health care is really not a priority at intake. This is true for the inmate as well as the facility. When an inmate arrives at a jail it is usually because they have just been arrested. Again, when I imagine myself in those shoes, I would be more concerned about when or if I could make bail, how to make contact with my family or someone who can help me and the immediate consequences of my arrest. My health care is not very important until I begin to feel bad. Being asked a bunch of questions about my health status and history is really an annoyance, especially if I believe I won’t be in jail very long. Prisons or detention facilities are different, but still at intake, health care is not likely to be as important as other things, such as housing, access to property, contact with family, and safety for most detainees. Later when these other concerns have been addressed, aspects of health care become more important.

So what does a correctional nurse do about this?

  1. Remember that intake screening is for the purpose of safety. It is to make the best determination possible about care or treatment that an inmate will need for the next few days. Establishing medical support for detoxification, arranging for an inmate to continue important medications and addressing trauma are the primary things to get done. It is not the best time to expect a complete history and physical.
  2. Think of every subsequent health care encounter as another opportunity to add meaningful information to the inmate’s health record. What was documented at intake may no longer be as accurate. Inmates are usually not very sophisticated about health care and may not know or remember what is important to tell their health care provider about. You can model this in your interaction with inmates and can also coach them in preparation for their primary care appointment. View each encounter as adding a chapter to a patient’s book rather than a battle over what the inmate gets or not.
  3. Take an objective look at what intake screening is like from the inmate’s perspective. Go out to booking or the intake area and observe the process. What is the experience like? Identify the things that may be barriers to giving information during health screening and see if anything can be changed to improve the process. Not all of the barriers can be eliminated but just knowing what they are gives a good picture of the things that make intake screening vulnerable to inaccuracy. This information can be used to identify inmates or the kinds of situations which might benefit from scheduled follow up.

Are there reasons that you think make intake health screening inaccurate or unreliable that are not mentioned in this post? What advice would you give others to improve the accuracy or reliability of intake health screening?

For more about the art and science of intake health screening refer to Chapter 14 about Health Screening in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. You can order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today.

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Contraband: Health or Security Issue? Part III

This month the Essentials of Correctional Nursing blog welcomes Gayle F. Burrow RN, BSN, MPH, CCHP-RN, Correctional Health Care Consultant from Portland, OR, to the blogging team. Gayle will share insights from her many years of jail nursing experience in a regular monthly rotation with ECN bloggers Catherine Knox and Lorry Schoenly.

The daily work in corrections health, whether a jail, prison or juvenile facility, easily becomes routine. Concerns for personal safety and facility security can fade as reliance is placed on standard operating procedures, custody colleagues, and our own growing familiarity with the criminal justice system. When this happens our safety can be threatened a couple ways. For correctional nurses, this can happen when someone becomes overfamiliar with a patient or when an inmate has been able to manipulate a staff member to bring drugs into the facility.

A news item reporting that a correctional staff member has assisted an inmate to escape from a facility can lead to a reaction like “How in the world could this happen?” Unfortunately, it does happen; even with good orientation, teamwork and communications.  Inmates have persuasive skills that they learned on the streets and staff member may be going through a difficult, vulnerable life situation. This can be a dangerous combination.

Objects and Relationship Contraband

The book “Games Criminal Play” was helpful to me when I entered the correctional nursing specialty many years ago. Although published in the 1980’s, the principles for dealing with inmate manipulation are timeless and remain helpful today. One key principle is that criminals have a manipulation process so subtle that victims rarely realize what is happening until it is too late. That is why it is important for us to be ever-vigilant in avoiding manipulation traps in our nurse-patient interactions. Here are some actual examples of inappropriate staff activities:

  • Forming a relationship while in the jail leading to the patient moving in with the staff member after release
  • Living with a drug dealer and passing on information to inmates
  • Putting money on an inmates books
  • Not reporting when a family member is in custody

Professionalism and Boundaries

Maintaining professional boundaries with patients is safe practice. Contraband can include not only sharp objects but also information, money and personal relationships. By being a skilled health practitioner, sensitive team member and grounded in yourself, you can deliver good health care while avoiding contraband participation.

To read more about the area of safety for the nurse and patient in correctional settings see Chapter 4 sections on contraband, medical contraband and professional boundaries in the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. You can order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

Contraband-Health or Security Issue? Part II

This month the Essentials of Correctional Nursing blog welcomes Gayle F. Burrow RN, BSN, MPH, CCHP-RN, Correctional Health Care Consultant from Portland, OR, to the blogging team. Gayle will share insights from her many years of jail nursing experience in a regular monthly rotation with ECN bloggers Catherine Knox and Lorry Schoenly.

The most common examples of contraband we think of are guns, knives (shanks), sharpened toothbrushes, hording medications, and homemade ropes.  When inmates attempt to hide contraband in their body, things can go awry. Here are a few examples:

  • A swallowed balloon of drugs leaks.
  • Eyebrow pencil mistakenly inserted into the urethra instead of the vagina.
  • A swallowed ring lodges in the intestine.
  • Wrapped razor blades cut into the bowel.
  • A wad of money or hidden jewelry causes a vaginal infection.
  • Horded medication traded to another inmate causes an allergic reaction.

Inmates know that bringing in or making unauthorized items is against the rules, so they do not want to tell anyone because they know they will receive discipline. They have read the inmate handbook about the rules inside the facility. Also, they do not want to give up their important possessions because this is the same way they kept valuables when living on the streets.

Patient Awareness

Health staff provide services in chronic disease management, evaluating care requests and medication management and emergency response.  The challenge is to find ways to make patients aware of contraband. This can be done by incorporating information into everyday nursing practice.  Some areas of nursing practice where the topic of the dangers of contraband can be discussed are:

  • At intake or booking, incorporate a statement of awareness that having unauthorized items on your person can have health consequences.
  • During health assessments or nursing sick call evaluations, take the time to mention that contraband is a health issue and we want to prevent any harmful consequences.
  • Posters or videos can be developed to bring awareness of the possible health consequences of some types of contraband.
  • Work with corrections or custody to expand the statements in the inmate handbook to include some health information about the trauma or illness from contraband.

Staff Awareness

Staff also need reminders to be continually aware of the medical implications of contraband. Here are some ways to keep contraband in the forefront of correctional health care activities:

  • Staff meeting or in-service discussing the types of contraband have effects on the health of our patients. Such things as pelvic infections, drug overdoses, perforated bowels, bowel obstructions, rectal bleeding, stomach problems, drug overdoses, trauma or injury can be emergencies from hidden objects.
  • Review contraband situations that have occurred in the facility and complete a Continuous Quality Improvement study to see what could be implemented to target areas for improvement. Use the plan, do, study, act cycle and information from NCCHC to evaluate ways to identify and improve care in this area.
  • Review procedures for sharps and controlled substances in medical. Reinforce the safety aspects of these important procedures.
  • Look at the orientation program to make sure it covers safety from both a custody and health perspective.
  • Work with custody to be a part of their procedures to identify and eliminate risk in the institution. Things that health should be notified about are finding stashes of medications, drugs found in housing areas, and finding things for suicide attempt.
  • Identify the difference when a provider finds a contraband item during a physical examination and when custody asks medical to perform a body cavity search. One is a consented exam and one is asked to do a forensic procedure only performed by personnel trained in this procedure. Body cavity searches are usually completed at the local emergency room by trained staff.  Guidance on the topic may assist in making decisions
  • Use a staff meeting or in-service time to outline the physical assessment skills necessary to identify contraband. Some system are the gastro intestinal system, pelvic area, rectal function, and signs and symptoms of infection.
  • Invite a custody representative to a staff meeting or in-service session to review contraband, what it is and what are examples found in the facility. Sometimes it is a rope, tattoo gun, sharp shank or maybe it is a cute wallet made from gum wrappers.  This increased awareness can change practices and result in discussions about projects or supplies in use by medical.

As a health professional, we have a special relationship with the patients and assist in maintaining their health and overcoming illness. Health staff interview and screen in booking and respond to requests for care and emergencies. We are there as advocates and support. With little in the literature to guide correctional health care in the area of health effects of contraband, we can learn about how to deliver care when things come up.

In the next article will be about a topic that is not easy to discuss. It relates to situations in which custody or health staff contribute to contraband items or comes under the control of an inmates demands.

Share your experiences with contraband in your institutions and share them with us in the comment sections of this post.

For more about correctional nursing practice consult the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

References

Standards for Health Services in Prisons, NCCHC, 2014 edition, Standard P-I-03, Forensic Information, pages 149-150.

Standards for Health Services in Jails, NCCHC, 2014 edition, Standard J-I-03, Forensic Information, pages 149-150.

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