The Circles in Your Practice

On a busy day and in the midst of patient care we are not always aware that much of our nursing practice care is a continuous process. Whether it is completing sick call, medication administration or counseling a patient, we are always “evaluating”. Nursing practice is circular, in that our patients continually respond to our health interventions and as nurses, we observe and act on that response. nursing-process-grid-11-7-16

The American Nurses Association defines correctional nursing as the “protection, promotion and optimization of health and abilities; prevention of illness and injury; alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response; advocacy for and delivery of health care to individuals, families, communities and populations under the jurisdiction of the criminal justice system”.

The Nursing Process

The American Nurses Association published the Correctional Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice in 2013. The goals of the scope and standards are to:

  • inform nurses and others about correctional nursing practice
  • guide nurse’s day-to-day practice and resolve conflicts
  • develop policy and procedure and other governance of professional practice
  • reflect on professional practice and plan improvement.

There are 16 standards of nursing practice with the first six delineating the steps in the nursing process. These six elements of the nursing process are circular as well as inter-related to each other.

  • Assessment is data collection about the patient’s health condition. Nurses use all their skills and senses to identify changes in a patient condition. By observing the patient, interviewing the patient, completing the physical examination, collection history information and reviewing of the patient’s health records an assessment is formulated.
  • Diagnosis is the nurse’s analysis of the data gathered and identification of the patient’s problem which results in the nursing diagnosis. The nurse also validates the diagnosis with the patient.
  • Outcomes Identification focuses the nursing diagnosis on the needs of the patient. The goal of nursing care is for the patient to achieve an improved level of functioning that is realistic to attain. Using the SMART technique, an acronym for setting goals that are specific, measureable, attainable, and realistic and time bound, assists in developing the outcome statement.
  • Planning  for the nursing interventions that will achieve the outcomes identified for the patient is the next step. These plans are specific to each patient and focuses on achievable outcomes. Planning, rather than reacting or practicing by rote, is more effective in reaching the goals of patient care.
  • Implementation are the action steps the nurse follows in carrying out the plan of care. Implementation may be one or more nursing intervention steps, and may take place over hours, weeks or months depending on the patient’s condition. Implementation requires the nurse to delegate care to subordinate personnel and communicate with colleagues to achieve completion of the patient’s plan of care.
  • Evaluation occurs all along during the nursing process. It is both the end and the beginning in the continuous process of care that is delivered to the patient. Documenting the patient’s response to interventions, evaluating their effectiveness and the outcomes achieved leads to modification or revision in the plan for care.  This illustrates how each step is fundamental to the circular process of nursing practice.

The nursing process is an integral part of every patient encounter. Expert nurses move through these steps fluidly without stopping to focus solely on each component. Nurses are attentive to their patient’s response to care provided all along the continuum from illness to wellness.

The Patient Plan & Documentation

The S.O.A.P method of documenting patient care is common in most correctional settings and is used as the main communication method in the patient’s health record. In the literature, two additional elements in SOAP charting are recommended; these are Intervention and Evaluation. These two additional elements of documentation align with the nursing process just discussed and support charting of continuous patient care.

  • S-Subjective: reports what the patient says
  • O-Objective: records what the nurse observes
  • A-Analysis: identifies a nursing diagnosis
  • P-Plan: describes nursing interventions
  • I-Implementation: records how those actions were carried out
  • E-Evaluation: reports the actual patient response and outcome.

This systematic approach to detailing patient care keeps us goal orientated and focused on how the patient is progressing in the treatment plan. With an eye toward always evaluating or “continuing” to evaluate a patient’s response to treatment, the nurse is ready to intervene to prevent an exacerbation of illness or unexpected response to treatment.

When nurses respond to requests for care, complete sick call assessments, administer medications and call patients up to check on how they are doing, it is part of the circular pathway of continually evaluating how our patients are or are not responding to care.

Next weeks’ blog topic will explore a third “circular” area of nursing practice, which is the Continuous Quality Improvement Process. Can you think of more circular processes in your nursing practice or insight into the continual evaluation process in nursing care? We would like to know your thoughts about the nursing process and SOAPIE process. Share in the comment section at the end of this post. We like to hear from you.

Read more about the practice of nursing in the correctional setting in our book the Essentials of Correctional Nursing. Order a copy directly from the publisher or from Amazon today!

 

Photo Credit: American Nurses Association NSPS’10_Fig 4. Nursing Process Standards.